CFZM: July 28, 2019

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Laskowski, who shares the following recording and notes:

Last night I took advantage of a clear Saturday night to head out to my favorite "dark sky" astronomy site south of Bourbon, Indiana to do some stargazing. I took my 5" telescope along with my favorite "accessory", my newly cleaned, aligned and recapped RF-2200. While waiting for sunset and darkness I recorded one hour of The Mighty KBC's Giant Jukebox and followed that up with a recording of three hours of Toronto's CFZM "Zoomer Radio and their weekly program Saturday Night Bandstand. While not SWBC, listening to Zoomer is a great way to spend a Saturday night under the stars. There is some fading and a strange growling noise which I believe was caused by having my digital recorder too close to the radio. Also some thunderstorm static can be heard from storms which popped up near the end of the recording. Both recordings were made with either the RF-2200's whip antenna for KBC or the internal ferrite swivel antenna for CFZM. Enjoy!

Broadcaster: CFZM

Date of recording: 7/28/2019

Starting time: 0210

Frequency: 740 kHz

Location: Bourbon, IN

The Mighty KBC: July 28, 2019

Panasonic-RF-2200-Dial-Angle-1.jpg

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Laskowski, who shares the following recording and notes:

Last night I took advantage of a clear Saturday night to head out to my favorite "dark sky" astronomy site south of Bourbon, Indiana to do some stargazing. I took my 5" telescope along with my favorite "accessory", my newly cleaned, aligned and recapped RF-2200. While waiting for sunset and darkness I recorded one hour of The Mighty KBC's Giant Jukebox and followed that up with a recording of three hours of Toronto's CFZM "Zoomer Radio and their weekly program Saturday Night Bandstand. While not SWBC, listening to Zoomer is a great way to spend a Saturday night under the stars. There is some fading and a strange growling noise which I believe was caused by having my digital recorder too close to the radio. Also some thunderstorm static can be heard from storms which popped up near the end of the recording. Both recordings were made with either the RF-2200's whip antenna for KBC or the internal ferrite swivel antenna for CFZM. Enjoy!

Broadcaster: The Mighty KBC

Date of recording: 7/28/2019

Starting time: 0100

Frequency: 9.925

Location: Bourbon, IN

Radio New Zealand International (Part 2): July 7, 2007

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The following recording was made by the late Michael Pool (The Professor) on July 7, 2007 with a Degen DE1103 in NYC. This recording (Part 1) was included in a post he had written on his blog, The Radio Kitchen. Click here to read this post in the SWLing Post Radio Kitchen Archive.

Here’s a description of this recording, written by The Professor. Note that the first recording was posted separately on the SRAA:

“[P]art two of this recording begins with the flip of the the tape. At the onset of this archive the interview is aborted in mid-sentence and a female announcer formally announces that Radio New Zealand International is closing on this frequency. After twice insisting that I “re-tune to six-zero-nine-five kilohertz in the forty-nine meter band” (followed by a clipped “This is New Zealand”), it all sounds so damn official that I felt compelled to follow the instructions. Although I knew that just because RNZI was booming in on 31 meters didn’t necessarily mean it would come in so strong (or might even be heard) on the 49 meter band.

You hear RNZI’s interval signal (the call of the New Zealand Bellbird) after the station ID, and then the signal at 9165kHz goes dead. I then put the tape deck on pause and punch up 6095 kHz on the Degen and release the pause button. And there it was! The call of the Bellbird is quite clear there as well, although a nearby signal is chewing on the edges of the reception a bit.

Whoever is running the board down there in the South Pacific was a little sloppy that night. After the interval signal the board-op starts to pot up the interview again (which is still running on one of the channels). But the mistake is corrected in a fraction of second, and it’s the news with Phil O’Brien. The lead story, a nationwide “Drunk Drive Blitz” the night before had netted over two-hundred inebriated kiwis on the highways down there. And an update on the aftermath of an unprecedented swarm of tornados that ravaged the North Island a couple of nights earlier.

After the news, it’s the beginning of a program I can barely believe I’m hearing in 2007. A faux flapper-era theme song launches a “nostalgia packed selection of favorites” that will saturate the skies of Oceania for the next four hours. While I love a lotta old music, the whole idea of “nostalgia” can get a little silly. Although I must say that old Joe Franklin used to pull it off with some charm on WOR here in New York City before he gave up the show a few years back. It’s really an approach to radio that’s all but dead here in the states. But apparently not in New Zealand.”

This recording was made on July 7, 2007 on 9615 kHz, then 6095 kHz, starting around 0658 UTC:

Radio Educación XEPPM-OC (Cultura México Señal Internacional): April 6, 2019

Mexico City, Mexico (Photo by Jezael Melgoza @jezael)

Mexico City, Mexico (Photo by Jezael Melgoza @jezael)

For your listening pleasure: Radio Educación (XEPPM) from Mexico City. This recording was made on April 6, 2019 starting around 0058 UTC on 6,185 kHz. The receiver used was a WinRadio Excalibur hooked to a large horizontal delta loop antenna—the recording was made in North Carolina, USA.

This recording includes music and news—all in Spanish. Enjoy:

Radio Educación XEPPM-OC (Cultura México Señal Internacional): April 1, 2019

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For your listening pleasure: Radio Educación (XEPPM) from Mexico City. This recording was made on April 1, 2019 starting around 0125 UTC on 6185 kHz. The receiver used was a WinRadio Excalibur hooked to a large horizontal delta loop antenna—the recording was made in North Carolina, USA.

Although XEPPM’s 1,000 watt signal often makes it into North America, it’s rare that it’s so clear and conditions are so quiet. Their jazz selection on this date was excellent. Enjoy:

WINB (Unique Radio): November 3, 2018

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Ian Pillar, who shares the following recording and notes:

A recording of Unique Radio via the facilities of WINB 9265 KHz Red Lion Pennsylvania USA @ 1200 -1240 HRS UTC with programming from Hobart Radio International . I do get a decent WINB signal from time to time which is surprising considering as the main beam hits Eastern Australia and New Zealand and I am on the other side of the country.

I received a very nice email from Tim Gaynor of Unique Radio confirming my reception

Receiver and antenna: Tecsun PL l 380 with a longwire

Radio Tahiti (music): unknown date

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Mark Pettifor, who writes:

One of the great things about DXing and SWLing is the variety of music one can hear. One of my favorite stations to listen to on shortwave for “exotic music” was Radio Tahiti, Papeete, French Polynesia, when they were still on shortwave.

If my memory serves me correctly, I believe something happened to the transmitter, and they never got back on SW. They were on mediumwave through December of 2016 (738 kHz); now they are on FM only. (Maybe us hobbyists should start a funding website to put them back on shortwave!)

Many a Saturday night I would turn on the DX-160 (my first SW rig) and let it warm up for a while, before tuning in 15170 to see how band conditions were. If the band was good, I’d get ready to record through the air. Once I started recording, I’d often leave the room and shut the door, because having three brothers around meant the possibilities were high for having “extraneous interference” on my recordings.

Saturday evenings were a good time to tune in, because of a music program that aired with a good selection of island music. The program had an announcer who spoke in the island vernacular (Tahitian?), and when that program ended they switched to French.

Here is a 30-min recording of Radio Tahiti on 15170 kHz from a while ago, most likely around one of the solar maxima of either 1980 or 1991. I’m leaning toward the 1980 cycle. My apologies for not being able to be more specific than that. I kept terrible records of my recordings. This would be recorded either with the DX-160 or a DX-302. Apologies too for the jump in volume at around the 2:37 mark.

So close your eyes, imagine you are lying in a hammock on a beach somewhere in the South Pacific, with a warm breeze off the ocean and your favorite cooled beverage nearby, listening to some of the best island music anywhere.

WSNJ FM (Bridgeton, NJ): "Moods in High-Fidelity" circa 1960s

(Image Source: FadedSignals.com)

(Image Source: FadedSignals.com)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bill Hemphill, who shares the following recording and notes:

Another flea market find. Date unknown – but most likely early 60’s.
This is an off-air recording of WSNJ radio (most likely the FM broadcast), Bridgeton, NJ. After some music, an announcer does station ID, weather, etc. The program “Moods in High-Fidelity” starts at about the 3’30” point. From the program introduction:
“We invite you to hear a special musical high-fidelity program designed to demonstrate the finest broadcasting and receiving equipment. Moods in High-Fidelity for your listening pleasure. Almo Audio Showcase and Weathers Industries present the finest in wide-range high-fidelity recordings together with interesting facts about hi-fi.”

The Report of the Week via WRMI: February 11, 2018

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Troy Riedel, who shares the following recording of The Report of the Week via WRMI:

Date of recording: 2/11/2018

Starting time: 2100 UTC

Frequency: 9.395 MHz

Reception location: Toano, VA

Receiver and antenna: Sony ICF-SW7600GR with Slinky Antenna

Notes: The Report of the Week (by VORW), entire show for the broadcast week Thu 02/08/2018 - Sun 02/11/2018.

Jazz From The Left: December 7, 2016

Dave Brubeck

Dave Brubeck

For your listening pleasure, Raoul van Hall's Jazz From the Left via WRMI.

This show was recorded on 7.730 MHz on Wednesday, December 7, 2016 starting around 00:00 UTC. The recording was make with a WinRadio Excalibur Receiver and a skyloop wire antenna in North Carolina. 

The Voice of Zaire (La Voix du Zaire) in French: July 1975

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Jack Widner, who notes:

La Voix du Zaire, 15.245khz shortwave, monitored July 1975 in Indiana USA.  This segment is mostly music ending with announcing the start of a program "hygiene et sante".  Approximate time would have been between 1900-2000 UTC.
Receiver/Antenna used: Hammarlund HQ180, 100 foot V-shaped longwire

2016 BBC Antarctic Midwinter Broadcast: June 21, 2016

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Mark Hist, who notes the following:

Thanks for alerting shortwave listeners to the British Antarctic Survey broadcast. It felt very poignant listening to a broadcast aimed at such a small number of people, with the voices of their loved ones being launched around the world.
I was able to record the broadcast from only 100 miles away from the Woofferton transmitter, so needless to say the quality and strength was very good. I imagine hearing that broadcast buried in the noise from far away with those happy birthday songs and best wishes must have been very emotional for its intended audience.
I enclose a short segment from my 30 minute recording, plus a photo (above) taken the next day of my set up (it was dark at the time of the recording).

I also recorded the broadcast from Saint-Anne-de-Beaupré, Québec, Canada. I wrote a post about this on the SWLing Post (click here to read). The following is my recording from 7360 kHz. Reception was not nearly as strong as that of Mark, above:

Note that we collected over 30 recordings--from accross the globe. You can listen to and browse them on the SWLing Post by clicking here.

KNLS Test Transmission: August 1, 1983

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Laskowski, who notes:

KNLS - Anchor Point, Alaska, from what I believe is a test transmission on August 1, 1983. According to Wikipedia, KNLS signed on the air July 23, 1983. The program consists of the sign-on ID in English and Russian then is mostly a mix of Big Band music. This recording is 31 minutes long.

Tom's receiver was a Sony ICF-2001 and he started recording at 09:00 UTC on 11.820 MHz. His location was South Bend, Indiana (USA):

Ecos del Torbes: March 1980 (2 Parts)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

Broadcasting from San Cristobal, Venezuela on 4980 kHz, Ecos del Torbes was well heard in midwestern North America in the evenings and early mornings.  Here is a recording of the station from the 11 PM hour (local time) in the spring of 1980.
There is a pleasant mix of English and Spanish language pop, featuring several Venezuelan artists in this aircheck.  There is also a brief newscast in the second half of the recording.  If anyone out there has a better understanding of Spanish than myself, I would like to know the specific headlines, as it would help me get the precise date this recording was made.

La Voz de Huila: April 27, 1980 (2 parts)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

In 1980, Daylight Saving Time began on the 27'th of April.  When I was in high school, the Saturday night overnight hours were a favorite time for me to listen to shortwave signals.  Especially the domestic Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.
On that night, two stations from Colombia were coming in reasonably well, and I decided to record an hour of each of them.
Based in the city of Neiva, "La Voz de Huila" was an affiliate of the TODELAR network ('Primeros en sintonia').  One could easily identify stations from this network through their top of the hour ID's (they used chimes similar to the NBC network in the USA).  The station's frequency was 6150 kHz.
Here is a recording of "La Voz de Huila," taken during the 4 AM hour (local time) on 27 April 1980