VOA (Communications World): January 2003

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bruce Atchison, for sharing the following recording and notes:

Recorded Communications World off VOA in January of 2003 but I forget the frequency. I used my Uniden CR-2021 receiver.

Note that Bruce is actually featured in this episode with Kim Andrew Elliott!

Palastinian Highjackings in Jordan (1970)

01 Armed Forces Radio & Television Service(AFRTS 8 Sept.1970)- The highjacking situation
02 Swiss Broadcasting Corporation (SBC) (8 Sept.1970)
03 Swiss Broadcasting Corporation (SBC) (11 Sept.1970)
04 VOA Evacuation announcement (25 Sept.1970)- Ian Holder:"It was a coincidence that I happened to have the recorder running while I was tuned to the Voice of America when this "evacuation from Jordan" announcement was made".

Recorded off-air by Ian Holder, Brisbane, Australia.

Information on the 1970 highjackings in Jordon-
http://middleeast.about.com/od/terrorism/a/dawson-field-hijackings.htm

VOA- Mars Landing (20 July, 1976)

Voice of America shortwave coverage of the landing of
an unmanned spacecraft (Viking 1) on Mars.

Recorded off-air by Ian Holder, Brisbane, Australia.

Viking 1 (1976) information-

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/viking-1/

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/sunset-at-the-viking-lander-1-site

Other broadcasts-

https://archive.org/details/@i_holder

 

Voice of America: July 20, 1979

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Laskowski, who shares this recording of the Voice of America from July 20, 1979 at 0500 UTC on the 31 meter band. Tom notes:

The first 4:30 is from a VOA newscast that aired before the main part of the program. The main recording was presented on the 10th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. I enjoy listening to this every year on the landing anniversary.

Voice of America: November 10, 2001

SRAA contributor, David Malins notes:

Was a high school student of 13-14 years old at the time of the recording who was interested in broadcasting and music - Recorded onto compact cassette at home of grandparent with a large enough back garden to mount a 20-30metre long wire antenna. Remastered recording via audacity for one of shortwaves' very few technical programmes on Shortwave at the time (never managed to tune into a second programme of the series at the same sort of time, despite searching on the web and on the same frequency range that the broadcasts usually were).
The recording is 7:30mins in length, featuring limited talk about "CIBAR", a section dedicated to what "worldband radio" is in regards to Shortwave, the book "Passport to Worldband Radio" and other bits and pieces when it moved onto a personal feature about a George Jacobs (which is when I stopped the tape, having been more interested in the technical and 'how it works' side of broadcasting news). (Never managed to find the name of the programme, but the presenter clearly states November 10th 2001 and the location where the programme was produced in regards to the type of outside antenna he was hoping to rig up before the winter in that part of the states.)

Many thanks for this contribution, David!

Update: Several listeners have written to confirm that this recording is of Kim Andrew Elliott's "Communications World" from the VOA. 

Voice Of America Science World: March 14, 2015

SRAA contributor, Richard Langley, was fortunate enough to capture this broadcast of VOA Science World where he (Richard Langley!) is interviewed. There are few opportunities for a true DXer to hear themselves over shortwave, thus this is a special recording indeed.  

Richard notes:

Live half-hour recording of the Voice of America in English on 14 March 2015 beginning at 02:56:30 UTC on a frequency of 6080 kHz. The broadcast, directed to Africa, is from Vatican Radio's Santa Maria di Galeria transmitter site (250 kW transmitter power, antenna beam 165 degrees). The African-music tuning signal is followed by VOA News and the program Science World featuring an interview with Dr. Richard Langley from the University of New Brunswick on how GPS is being used to study irregularities in the ionosphere and their effects on radio signals.  

The broadcast was received on a Tecsun PL-880 receiver with its built-in whip antenna in Hanwell (just outside Fredericton), New Brunswick, Canada. Signal quality was only fair so the recorded file was electronically filtered to reduce background noise. There is still a noticeable jamming signal on the frequency.

Voice of America: September 30, 2014

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Andre Bagley, for this recording of the Voice of America. Andre writes:

A recording of VOA (Voice of America) at 1730-1830 at 17895 Khz. Received on a Tecsun PL-600 with telescopic whip and attached random wire, near the Great Salt Lake in the United States.
Broadcast appears to focus on Health issues, particularly concerning Ebola and it's effects on daily life in Western Africa. Listen to the last couple minutes for tips they give to avoid getting Ebola.

This recording was made on  30 September 2014 starting at 1730 UTC on 17.895 Mhz. 

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Voice of America, English: February 22, 2014

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Many thanks to SWAA contributor, Frank, for this recording of the Voice of America. This broadcast was recorded on February 22, 2014 at 17:00 UTC on 13,755 kHz. Frank mentions that one hour of the recording in English originated from the 100 kW Botswana transmitter; 30 minutes of recording originated from the 250 kW Iranawila transmitter.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Voice of America: circa 1968

Willis Conover broadcasting with Voice of America in 1969 (Source: Wikipedia)

Willis Conover broadcasting with Voice of America in 1969 (Source: Wikipedia)

Many thanks to David Firth, who is kindly sharing shortwave radio recordings he made on his reel-to-reel recording equipment in the late 1960s. Firth is uncovering and digitizing these off air recordings as time allows.

We are grateful for this recording of the Voice of America, which Firth recorded in 1968. 

This recording will surely bring back memories with clips from VOA Jazz Hour (Willis Conover), the VOA Breakfast Show, and VOA Special English

The first time I heard Firth's recording, the Willis Conover clip gave me chills. 

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Afia Darfur/Hello Darfur: February 8, 2014

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For your listening pleasure: Afia Darfur/Hello Darfur. This broadcast was recorded on February 8, 2014 starting around 03:00 UTC on 9,845 kHz. While Afia Darfurt was scheduled for the Selebria-Phikwe transmitter site, I believe this particular broadcast may have been relayed by the Voice of America in Greenville, North Carolina, based on signal strength and the VOA interval signal.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

VOA Learning English: January 4, 2014

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For your listening enjoyment:  The Voice of America's Learning English service (formerly VOA Special English).

This VOA broadcast was recorded on January 4, 2014 starting a little before 01:30 UTC on 7,465 kHz. It begins with a few seconds of VOA’s interval signal.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

VOA Special English

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I believe that VOA Special English may be one of the best educational resources on the shortwaves. At Ears To Our World, we find that it is often the most popular program in countries where English may be the official language, but where locals only speak it as a second language. Over four years ago, I mentioned a Special English broadcast honoring Henry Loomis, the creator and champion of Special English at the VOA. Click here to read the archived post.

I recorded this particular broadcast of VOA Special English on March 19, 2013 at 1:30 UTC on 5,960 kHz.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3 file, or simply listen via the embedded player below: