Radio New Zealand International (Part 2): July 7, 2007

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The following recording was made by the late Michael Pool (The Professor) on July 7, 2007 with a Degen DE1103 in NYC. This recording (Part 1) was included in a post he had written on his blog, The Radio Kitchen. Click here to read this post in the SWLing Post Radio Kitchen Archive.

Here’s a description of this recording, written by The Professor. Note that the first recording was posted separately on the SRAA:

“[P]art two of this recording begins with the flip of the the tape. At the onset of this archive the interview is aborted in mid-sentence and a female announcer formally announces that Radio New Zealand International is closing on this frequency. After twice insisting that I “re-tune to six-zero-nine-five kilohertz in the forty-nine meter band” (followed by a clipped “This is New Zealand”), it all sounds so damn official that I felt compelled to follow the instructions. Although I knew that just because RNZI was booming in on 31 meters didn’t necessarily mean it would come in so strong (or might even be heard) on the 49 meter band.

You hear RNZI’s interval signal (the call of the New Zealand Bellbird) after the station ID, and then the signal at 9165kHz goes dead. I then put the tape deck on pause and punch up 6095 kHz on the Degen and release the pause button. And there it was! The call of the Bellbird is quite clear there as well, although a nearby signal is chewing on the edges of the reception a bit.

Whoever is running the board down there in the South Pacific was a little sloppy that night. After the interval signal the board-op starts to pot up the interview again (which is still running on one of the channels). But the mistake is corrected in a fraction of second, and it’s the news with Phil O’Brien. The lead story, a nationwide “Drunk Drive Blitz” the night before had netted over two-hundred inebriated kiwis on the highways down there. And an update on the aftermath of an unprecedented swarm of tornados that ravaged the North Island a couple of nights earlier.

After the news, it’s the beginning of a program I can barely believe I’m hearing in 2007. A faux flapper-era theme song launches a “nostalgia packed selection of favorites” that will saturate the skies of Oceania for the next four hours. While I love a lotta old music, the whole idea of “nostalgia” can get a little silly. Although I must say that old Joe Franklin used to pull it off with some charm on WOR here in New York City before he gave up the show a few years back. It’s really an approach to radio that’s all but dead here in the states. But apparently not in New Zealand.”

This recording was made on July 7, 2007 on 9615 kHz, then 6095 kHz, starting around 0658 UTC:

Radio New Zealand International (Part 1): July 7, 2007

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The following recording was made by the late Michael Pool (The Professor) on July 7, 2007 with a Degen DE1103 in NYC. This recording (Part 1) was included in a post he had written on his blog, The Radio Kitchen. Click here to read this post in the SWLing Post Radio Kitchen Archive.

Here’s a description of this recording, written by The Professor. Note that we will post the second recording in a separate post on the SRAA:

“This first bit is an interview with Canadian chemist and author Penny LeCouteur discussing her book about molecules that have changed the world. Of note here– the legacy of how James Cook and ascorbic acid made the south seas safe for European explorers and colonists.

Then the cassette came to an abrupt stop, and the part two of this recording begins with the flip of the the tape.”

This recording was made on July 7, 2007 on 9615 kHz starting around 0644 UTC:

Radio New Zealand International: October 8, 2015

A portion of the "All Night Programme" on RNZI, with news at 1500.  Broadcasting at 50 kw from Rangitaiki to Oceania.  Received and recorded in Sydney, Australia, using a Nooelec brand rtl-sdr with R820T chip (wrapped in foil and copper tape and connected with USB extension cables loaded with ferrites and a powered USB hub), the Nooelec Ham-it-Up HF Upconverter version 1.2, a homebrew indoor broomstick antenna, and SDR Console version 2.3 build 2194.

Radio New Zealand International: November 8, 2014

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Julie, for this recording of Radio New Zealand international. 

This broadcast was recorded in Australia on November 8, 2014 starting around 0957 UTC on 9765 kHz. Julie notes that this broadcast contains "News, Weather, Part Three of the series "Innerview" about the band the Doors, frequency sign off and interval signal."

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Radio New Zealand International: June 28, 2014

Milford Sound, New Zealand

Milford Sound, New Zealand

For your listening pleasure: three hours of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on June 28, 2014 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,700 kHz.

This recording begins with the The RNZI interval signal: the charming and unmistakable call of the New Zealand Bellbird. After top-of-the-hour news breaks, you’ll hear Peter Fry’s music request show, Saturday Night (click hear to read more about Fry).

Peter Fry will be retiring this week.  His last show will be Saturday (July 5th). I will certainly miss hearing Peter Fry on the air, but wish him the best in retirement.

Click here to download this recording of RNZI as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International: June 6, 2014

Many thanks to SWAA contributor, Greg Shoom, for this recording of Radio New Zealand International. 

Greg recorded this broadcast of RNZI from his home in Toronto, Canada on June 6, 2014, on 11,725 kHz, starting at 04:59 UTC, using a Sony ICF-2010 receiver with a Sony AN-12 active antenna.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Radio New Zealand International: May 24, 2014

Road to Mt. Cook, New Zealand by  B.muirhead  (WikiMedia Commons)

Road to Mt. Cook, New Zealand by B.muirhead (WikiMedia Commons)

For your listening pleasure: two hours, fifty nine minutes of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on May 24, 2014 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,700 kHz. This recording was made on a WinRadio Excalibur SDR and a large horizontal delta loop wire antenna.

This recording begins with the The RNZI interval signal: the charming and unmistakable call of the New Zealand Bellbird.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International: April 5, 2014

For your listening pleasure: three hours of Radio New Zealand International.

This broadcast was recorded on 9,700 kHz, starting at 07:59 UTC on April 5, 2014. This weekend RNZI broadcast includes Peter Fry's Saturday Night music request show--always a treat to hear.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. 

Radio New Zealand International: March 1, 2014

Mount Cook, located on New Zealand's South Island, is the highest point in the country. ( Source: Wikipedia )

Mount Cook, located on New Zealand's South Island, is the highest point in the country. (Source: Wikipedia)

For your listening pleasure: three full hours of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on March 1, 2014 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,765 kHz.

This recording begins with the The RNZI interval signal: the charming and unmistakable call of the New Zealand Bellbird. Besides the music request show, Saturday Night, you'll also hear a documentary featuring The Beatles (and Beatlemania).

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International: February 22, 2014

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For your listening pleasure: three full hours of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on February 22, 2014 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,765 kHz.

This recording begins with the The RNZI interval signal: the charming and unmistakable call of the New Zealand Bellbird. The first two hours of the recording feature the music request show, Saturday Night, followed by one hour of Wayne's Music.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International: February 8, 2014

Peter Fry, host of Saturday Night on Radio New Zealand

Peter Fry, host of Saturday Night on Radio New Zealand

If you've ever had the distinct pleasure of tuning to Radio New Zealand International when their musical request show, Saturday Night, is on the air, chances are that you've become, like I have, addicted to this show.

The show's inimitable host, Peter Fry, has one of the best radio presences in the business. His warm personality and penchant for playing absolutely anything back-to-back will captivate you. You'll hear songs and genres (including comedy skits) spanning the decades, and Fry offers his excellent commentary between sets.

What amazes me, too, (when I stop to think about it) is the relatively robust audio fidelity from RNZI's shortwave signal here in eastern North America, especially considering that this broadcast originates in Rangitaiki, on the north island of New Zealand, and is powered by only 50 kilowatts, a modest signal by international broadcasting standards.  RNZI's signal crosses the Pacific at the speed of light–and at 6 watts per mile, by my calculations–delivers my Saturday Night as clearly as if it originated...well, locally.

The RNZI signal travels a full 8,249 miles (13,276 kilometers) to reach my radio.

The RNZI signal travels a full 8,249 miles (13,276 kilometers) to reach my radio.

Yes, shortwave radio is magic.  And so is Peter Fry's show:  Enjoy.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

This broadcast was recorded on February 8, 2014 starting around 07:59 UTC on 9,765 kHz. This broadcast originated from the Rangitaiki, NZ transmitter site (50 kW).

Radio New Zealand International: January 17, 2014

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One of my favorite shortwave radio broadcasters is Radio New Zealand International. RNZI has authoritative news--with a focus on NZ and the Pacific islands--music, sports and their own unique character, though they operate on a very modest budget by international broadcasting standards.

The RNZI interval signal is charming and unmistakable: the call of the New Zealand Bellbird.

For your listening pleasure: two full hours of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on January 17, 2014 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,765 kHz.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International: November 22, 2013

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For your listening pleasure: two full hours of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on November 22, 2013 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,765 kHz.

This recording begins with the The RNZI interval signal: the charming and unmistakable call of the New Zealand Bellbird.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International

The New Zealand Bellbird (Anthornis melanura) provides the interval signal for RNZI (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

One of my favorite shortwave radio broadcasters is Radio New Zealand International. RNZI has authoritative news--with a focus on NZ and the Pacific islands--music, sports and their own unique character, though they operate on a very modest budget by international broadcasting standards.

The RNZI interval signal is charming and unmistakable: the call of the New Zealand Bellbird.

Fortunately, in the 3 hour recording of RNZI below, I caught not only the interval signal as the broadcast began, but also as it went off the air. This recording was made on March 14th 2013 starting around 8:00 UTC on 9,765 kHz. (You'll note news of the Pope.)

Click here to download the full broadcast as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Note to SWLing Post reader, Mike: I hope you enjoy these sounds from home!