Radio Vaticana - Pope's Christmas Message and Urbi et Orbi Blessing: December 25, 2018

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Live, off-air, approximately forty-minute recording of the 2018 Christmas Message and "Urbi et Orbi" Blessing of Pope Francis as broadcast by Radio Vaticana (Vatican Radio), a division of Vatican Media, on 25 December 2018 beginning at 10:50 UTC on a shortwave frequency of 15695 kHz. This broadcast originated from a 250 kW transmitter at Santa Maria di Galevia, north of Rome, and was beamed to central Africa with an antenna beam azimuth of 145┬░.

This broadcast was the English-commentary version of the Radio Vaticana special Christmas Day broadcasts. After the Radio Vaticana interval signal, five or siz minutes of classical music can be heard before the commentator introduces the broadcast. At about 11:00 UTC, commands of the Pontifical Swiss Guard can be heard. This is followed by abbreviated versions of The Pontifical Hymn ("Motetum Vaticanum") and the Italian national anthem ("Il Canto degli Italiani") as played by the Band of the Pontifical Swiss Guard and the Carabinieri Band of the Italian Armed Forces. The appearance of Pope Francis on the central loggia of St. Peter's Basilica is greeted with cheers. He delivered, in Italian, his annual Christmas message ahead of the traditional blessing "Urbi et Orbi" (to the city [Rome] and to the world). This was translated simultaneously by the commentator. Pope Francis also recited the Angelus prayer and the plenary indulgence (in Latin). Following his speech, there was a military salute to Pope Francis with abridged versions again of the anthems. The Bells of St. Peter's peal as the Swiss Guard and the Carabinieri exchange salutes. After the interval signal, two popular Christmas music tunes featuring pan pipes end the broadcast.

The broadcast was received by the Web-interface wideband software-defined radio at the University of Twente in Enschede, The Netherlands, with a "Mini-Whip" antenna in AMSync mode with 5.08 kHz total bandwidth RF filtering. Reception was very good with a reasonably strong interference-free signal with only slight fading at times.

NDR - Gruss an Bord: December 24, 2018

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Two live, off-air, two-hour recordings of the special annual Gruss an Bord broadcast from German broadcaster NDR, Norddeutscher Rundfunk, on 24 December 2018 beginning at 19:00 UTC. The broadcast features Christmas music and greetings for mariners around the world and a church service. The Christmas greetings were recorded at two events on the second Advent Sunday (9 December) in Leer and on the third Advent Sunday (16 December) in Hamburg. Relatives and friends had the opportunity to wish their loved ones at sea a happy holiday and a happy new year. The Leer event featured the Bingumer Shanty Choir and the trio Anne-Fleur Schoch trio while the Hamburg event featured Isabella Rapp and the Lars-Luis Linek band. At about 21:00, there was a protestant Christmas Mass from the Neust├Ądter Hof and Stadtkirche St. Johannis in Hanover. The broadcast was primarily in German with some greetings and songs in English. A news bulletin preceded the program segments at 19:00 and 22:00 UTC.

In addition to being carried on the NDR Info and NDR Info Spezial networks, the broadcast was transmitted around the world on shortwave using transmitters in Nauen (NAU), Germany; Moosbrunn (MOS), Austria; Issoudun (ISS), France; and Gavar (ERV), Armenia; and was organized by Media Broadcast.

The schedule for 1900-2100 UTC was:
6030 kHz ERV 100 kW / 305 deg to West/Central Europe
6080 kHz NAU 125 kW / 250 deg to Northern Atlantic
9570 kHz MOS 100 kW / 115 deg to Indian Ocean East
9740 kHz NAU 125 kW / 130 deg to Indian Ocean West
9800 kHz ISS 250 kW / 148 deg to Indian Ocean/South Africa
11650 ISS 250 kW / 195 deg to Southern Atlantic
and for 2100-2300 UTC:
6145 kHz NAU 125 kW / 250 deg to Northern Atlantic
6155 kHz ERV 100 kW / 305 deg to West/Central Europe
9590 kHz ISS 250 kW / 148 deg to Indian Ocean/South Africa
9650 kHz MOS 100 kW / 115 deg to Indian Ocean East
9720 kHz NAU 125 kW / 130 deg to Indian Ocean West
9830 kHz ISS 250 kW / 195 deg to Southern Atlantic

The first recording is primarily of the transmission on the frequency of 11650 kHz between 19:00 and about 20:00 UTC, then switching to the frequency of 6080 kHz. During the news bulletin, the various frequencies were tried. The second recording is of the transmission between about 21:00 and 23:00 UTC on the frequency of 6145 kHz. Again, the various frequencies were tried to find the best one.

The transmissions were received outdoors on a Tecsun PL-880 receiver with a Tecsun AN-03L 7-metre wire antenna in Hanwell (just outside Fredericton), New Brunswick, Canada, in AM mode with 5 kHz RF filtering. Reception started out just fair and somewhat noisy, not surprising given that the receiver was not in a target zone. Improves slightly with change of frequency at 20:00 UTC. Reception during the second recording was fairly good but, again, with some noise.

Radio South Africa (RSA) New Year's Eve Broadcast: December 31, 1977

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording of Radio South Africa which was originally recorded on December 31, 1977 from his home in Plymouth, MN using a Hammarlund HQ-180:

During the late 1970s, Radio South Africa (RSA) would broadcast a New Years call-in show. This recording is from 1/1/1978 (12/31/1977 in the US). At two minutes into the recording, you can hear the interval signal for RAI (Italy) in the background. I have scoped (edited) the music. Unsure how long RSA carried on this tradition, but heard a similar call-in broadcast the following year on 1/1/1979.

Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #7): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.

Korean Central Broadcasting Service (KCBS) Pyongyang: November 16, 2016

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Manfred Reiff, who shares the following recording and notes:

[The following recording is of] the sign-on of Korean Central Broadcasting Station domestic service from Pyongyang. The recording was made on Nov 16, 2016 at 20:27:36 UTC (when North Korea was on UTC + 8.5 hours) on 2850 kHz.

The programming begins after approx. 57 seconds with ID signal and station identification in Korean by male and female. Following the time signal it's their national anthem (instrumental version). After that opening announcements my male and female and a second announcement by female. After that you can listen (like on each day of the year) to their "Number One Hit" - a vocal version of s"Song of General Kim Il Sung". After that KCBS presents their #2: "Song of Genal Kim Jong Il". A very boring programme scheme.

Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #6): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.

Nicaraguan clandestine radio station, Radio Sandino: July 17, 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Garavas, who shares the following recording and notes:

Radio Sandino, Nicaraguan clandestine radio station, voice of the Sandinista National Liberation Front. Recorded the day Anastasio Somoza DeBayle resigned the presidency and fled to Miami.

The following is a translation of the first two minutes of the announcement:

"Somoza is leaving. During these moments, [inaudible]. No one shall act freely. Everyone should act under orders of the one responsible [over them], under instruction of the national joint leadership, FSLN (Sandinista National Liberation Front). We must prevent, at all costs, the individual energy and [inaudible]. The FSLN guarantees publicly and emphatically to respect life and physical integrity of all military and their families once this fight is over. Nicaraguan brothers, abiding by the provisions of the new government, FSLN, reaffirms publicly that executions will not be allowed, nor physical violence against those military members who comply with the orders to ceasefire. Denying disseminated malicious versions by the Somoza [government], the new government of national reconstruction guarantees that the death penalty shall not apply to any military member guilty or not of a crime. The ordinary courts of justice will be the ones who will recognize [inaudible] and judgement. We alert all of the honest officers of the national guard that the Somoza Security Office has initiated a fierce persecution against all honest officers. We call upon you to not let them, and to trust in the guarantee the new government of national reconstruction offers you. We reiterate that every honest officer can integrate to the new patriotic military. We know that many military members have not had the opportunity to get out of the Somoza military. To those, we ask to have confidence in the imminent victory."

This recording was made on July 17, 1979 at 0500 UTC in Plymouth, MN (USA) using a Hammarlund HQ-180 and longwire antenna.


Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #5): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.

Radio Afghanistan Station ID (English): Late 1970s

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Manfred Reiff, who shares the following recording and notes:

This second [Radio Afghanistan] recording was made at the end of the 1970s during the soviet occupation of Afghanistan when RA programmes were rebroadcasted via Soviet transmitters. In this case it is the english service beamed to several parts of Asia.

The recording was made one some day at 0900 GMT on 15435 kHz. It was a relay via Soviet transmitter.

Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #4): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.

Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #3): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.

Radio Afghanistan Station ID (English): 1976

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Manfred Reiff, who shares the following recording and notes:

The first [Radio Afghanistan] recording is from 1976. The recording was made with the GRUNDIG Satellit 600 Professional recorder unit prototype I got from my uncle who worked at GRUNDIG as mentioned before.

Date: ?, sometime in 1976

Time: around 1130 GMT/UTC

QRG: 15195 kHz

Listen carefully to this recording. In the background you can hear the VOA Yankee Doodle played before starting its programmes. The programme was broadcast via the BBC Ascencion Island Relay, at 1130 GMT the VOA programme in Spanish for South America began. Later in the recording you can also hear Radio Moscow's ID signal.

US Coast Guard Radio Station NMC: Summer of 2003

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bruce Atchison, for sharing the following recording and notes:

As for radio station NMC, I forget the frequency. It was somewhere in the aircraft band, somewhere about 8000KHZ. I used a Kenwood TS440S transceiver and I believe it was taped in the summer of 2003. Sorry I can't be more exact.

Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #2): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.

Radio Australia "DXers Calling" Final Program: October 30, 1977

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Manfred Reiff, who shares the following recording and notes:

I made this recording on (our) Sunday 30 October 1977 at 0841 to 0853 GMT (now: UTC) on 21570 kHz. It was one of my first recordings made with a newly bought GRUNDIG Satellit 600 Professional. I used both the built-in Telescope Antenna (144 centimeters in length) and a self-made outdoor antenna consisting of steel mast of 10 meters in height. On top of the mast my dad and I installed a copper pipe of nearly 5 meters in which we put a solid steel mast. In the gap my dad filled in liquid silicone to stabilize the system. We connected both metallic parts so it looked like a conductor. The antenna still exists although I moved to another location in 1987.

Please note that it is the original recording without editing it (reduce noise).

This recording was made on 30 October 1977, starting at 0841 GMT on 21,570 kHz:

Radio New Zealand: July 1988

QSL source: WillPhillips.org.uk

QSL source: WillPhillips.org.uk

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bruce Atchison, for sharing the following recording and notes:

This is Radio New Zealand but I forgot the frequency. I recorded this in July of 1998 with my Uniden CR-2021. I can't remember the time either. I hope your listeners get a chuckle about this silly radio experiment.

Radio Moscow Mailbag (Studio Recording #1): 1979

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Tom Gavaras, who shares the following recording (from a series of seven studio recordings) and notes:

These recordings were originally provided to me on reel-to-reel tape directly from Radio Moscow (which I dubbed to a cassette). At that time, I was program director at St. Cloud State University's radio station KVSC-FM (St. Cloud, MN) and aired Moscow Mailbag once a week during the afternoon news block programming. Transcription shows from other shortwave stations were played on other weekday slots at the same time.


Radio For Peace International: Summer of 1996

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bruce Atchison, for sharing the following recording and notes:

This is Radio For Peace International from the summer of 1996. I can't remember the frequency but I'm sure others will. I recorded this about 01:00 UTC with my Uniden CR-2021. By the way, it's the same model as the Radio Shack 430 receiver but it had LEDs rather than a analogue tuning meter.

World of Radio: August 1987

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bruce Atchison, for sharing the following recording and notes:

This portion of Glenn Hauser's World of Radio show was taped in August of 1987 with my Sony ICF7600 receiver on 9850 kHz. It was on at 0200 UTC but I can't remember the station it was on. Perhaps it was WRNO.

Voice of Turkey: August 1, 2018

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Voice of Turkey recorded in London, UK on August 01, 2018 at 1900 UTC on the frequency of 9460 kHz using AirSpy Mini, SpyVerter and DX Engineering NCC-1 phaser connected to two Wellbrook ALA1530S+ antennas (positioned indoors) to mitigate severe local man-made interference.