Radio Afghanistan Station ID (English): Late 1970s

Radio Afghanistan QSL.jpg

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Manfred Reiff, who shares the following recording and notes:

This second [Radio Afghanistan] recording was made at the end of the 1970s during the soviet occupation of Afghanistan when RA programmes were rebroadcasted via Soviet transmitters. In this case it is the english service beamed to several parts of Asia.

The recording was made one some day at 0900 GMT on 15435 kHz. It was a relay via Soviet transmitter.

RX4M - The Voice of Clipperton station ID: Circa Late 1970s

(Source: North American Pirate Radio Hall Of Fame)

(Source: North American Pirate Radio Hall Of Fame)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Colin Newell, who shares two recordings from the late 1970s of the pirate radio station RX4M The Voice of Clipperton. 

Colin recorded both of these station IDs from British Columbia, Canada, using his cassette recorder. Colin also notes that he may be the only person to have ever recorded RX4M off-air. RX4M was inducted into the North American Pirate Radio Hall Of Fame in 2011.  The following is an excerpt from an article written by Andrew Yoder on the NA Pirate Radio Hall of Fame site :

RX4M (Radio Experiment on 40 Meters) put in more time and hours to overcome obscurity, only to quickly fall back into obscurity, thanks to a pirate-unfriendly location in Washington State. Even by the mid-‘80s, few DXers or pirate listeners had heard RX4M, and few remembered it.
The first difficulty for RX4M to overcome was the poor communications of the late ‘70s. When the station began broadcasting in August 1979, there was no Internet and all DX news either was discovered via monthly bulletin or magazine, meaning a minimum delay of two months for information to be reported. 
The next problem was the Pacific Northwest. At the time, very few shortwave DXers and almost no pirate listeners were located in the region. Some young pirate listeners were networking in southern California, toward Los Angeles, but even that was a long haul from the Seattle area. 
Despite a nightly broadcast schedule and boasting two transmitters (20 and 100 watts), no DXers in either NASWA or the Newark News Radio Club (two of the largest shortwave clubs of the time, and two of the best for pirate news) reported RX4M until April 1980 on 7370 kHz.
The few listeners who remember RX4M know it as possibly the only North American pirate to operate with a regular shortwave station, like a licensed outlet. It was on nightly from *0550-0630* UTC with a variety of programs produced by different station staff: News with Tony Giles, Post Office Box 80 with Aaron Richardson, DX Forum with Mickey Anderson, Let’s Talk Technical with Larry Adams, and the Good Morning Show with Jerry Nelson. Other time slots were filled with old-time radio programs, such as Burns & Allen, Jack Benny, Fibber McGee & Molly, Sherlock Holmes, Fred Harris & Alice Faye.
[...]RX4M, the Voice of Cliperton, was never heard again and no shortwave pirate since has adopted its style. At a time when many DXers were bitterly anti-pirate, many reporters said that RX4M programming sounded very professional. 

Israel Radio and Radio Cairo: 1973 Yom Kippur War

Egyptian forces crossing the Suez Canal on October 7 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Egyptian forces crossing the Suez Canal on October 7 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits two recordings: Israel Radio and Radio Cairo, both made during the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

Dan comments:

These recordings of Israel Radio, and Radio Cairo were made during the 1973 Yom Kippur war. A lot of history here -- you hear a newscast from Jerusalem, mentions of King Hussein, President Nixon, and others. This was a time when shortwave radio could actually bring you information that was not immediately available, as it is today in 2014 via the Internet and news alerts.

Click on the recording title below to download each recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded players.

Israel Radio:

Yemen Radio (Aden): circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Yemen Radio, Aden.

Dan comments:

Yemen was once two countries -- North and South -- with separate shortwave stations in Sanaa, and in Aden.   The country united in 1990, but before that for many years the separate capitals were represented on shortwave, with Aden using the 60 meter frequency of 5.060 MHz.  It was tough to hear.   This recording was made in the 1970's -- you will hear the station ID by a male announcer.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Iran, Tehran: circa 1970s

Azadi square and tower, constructed 1971 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Azadi square and tower, constructed 1971 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits two recordings of Radio Iran, Tehran.

Dan comments:

Back in the 70's, Radio Iran had an external service, as it still does today, and used the odd frequency of 12.176 mhz which was well heard in North America. Consulting Internet archives, I see an English language program time of 2000 UTC, which sounds about right. The interval signal and sign on are classic examples of old shortwave programming, and this one truly brought Iran right into the living room. The ID: "From the heart of the Middle East, in Iran's capital city, Tehran, the foreign language program department of Radio Iran invites you to listen for the next half hour as we bring you music, news and special features designed to acquaint you with the modern Iran today and to share with you something of the heritage of its fascinating cultural past.

Click on each title to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded players below.

Recording #1:

Falkland Islands Broadcasting Service: circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits recordings of the Falkland Islands Broadcasting Service.

Dan comments:

One of the great rarities for shortwave listeners the world over was, of course, the Falkland Islands Broadcasting Station (FIBS). There was great excitment, I still remember to this day, when FIBS was heard by a well-known DX'er in the western U.S. -- I recall the frequency at the time as being 3.958, which was listed in the the World Radio TV Handbook. Many DX'ers spent many hours seeking out FIBS, and it was only some years later, after the station shifted to a frequency of 2,380 khz that it began to be heard quite widely, though still a challenge. These recordings were made in Washington, DC using a Hammarlund HQ-180A receiver.

If you would like to read a brief history of the FIBS, please click here

Click on each title to download recordings as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded players below.

Recording #1:

Radio 4VEH, Haiti: circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Radio 4VEH in Haiti.

Dan comments:

Another shortwave memory for DX'ers was 4VEH, in Haiti, which began in 1950.  This station transmitted on a variety of SW frequencies, including one many of us heard, 15.280 which had a power of only 350 watts.  This recording of the station includes a classic ID:   "Radio 4VEH, the sound of light."  The history of shortwave broadcasting from Haiti is quite interesting and can be obtained through an Internet search.

[Indeed, here is a brief timeline of 4VEH.]

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Mexico (XERMX), circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Mexico on 11,770 kHz.

Dan comments:

Radio Mexico, like Brazil some years later, inaugurated an international service in multiple languages, including English, heard on several major meter bands. This recording was made in the early 70's using a Pilot Radio T-133.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Madagascar English Service

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Madagascar English Service with station ID.

Dan comments:

"Little known to many shortwave listeners, although a peek in the World Radio TV Handbook would have revealed, was the existence of Radio Madagascar's "International Service"   With a frequency of 17.730 mhz in the 16 meter band, this was one of the more difficult catches, though on a good propagation day such as this one, the station could be heard quite well in North America.   Here, you hear the station ID in the clear by a woman during a musical program.  Radio Madgascar was also quite good with QSLing and many listeners have one or more of their classic cards in their collections."

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Mali Bamako (International Service 16 Meters) circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this recording of Radio Mali Bamako

Dan comments:

Another in the unusual category from my 1970's archives is Radio Mali, with what it called its "International Service".   Mali, at some point in the 70's had acquired new shortwave transmitters -- it would be interesting history to determine where they came from, perhaps former Soviet Union or Eastern bloc.  These were listed in WRTH's and this reception was from the 16 meter band, heard in the afternoon in Levittown, PA.   This was among many stations I heard on the first radio I used as an SWL, a Pilot Radio T-133, my grandmother's radio, which I still have today.  I have played this audio at SWL Fests here in the United States, and offer it here on the archive as another example of SW stations of the past.

Many thanks for sharing this recording of Radio Mali Bamako, Dan.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Windward Islands Broadcasting Service (WIBS): circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this recording of the Windward Islands Broadcasting Service (WIBS).

Dan comments:

Collectors of QSL cards will recognize WIBS -- it was one of the most reliable verifiers in the 1960's and 1970's. The country eventually became, as everyone knows, Grenada, and replaced the original WIBS card with one for Radio Grenada that looked quite similar.
Windwards Islands BC Service was one of those great regulars for DX'ers in the 70's -- it could be heard as high as the 21 mhz band, but was probably most often remembered using 15.045 mhz. In 1972, it became Radio Grenada, and later Radio Free Grenada.
Excellent histories can be seen here:
Many of us remember enjoying hours of broadcasts from the old WIBS, including cricket and BBC news relays, along with some fascinating local commercials and othe programming.

Click the title of each recording below to download as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded audio players.

Windward Is Broadcasting Service (Raw Recording):

Radio Turks & Caicos VSI8 circa 1970's

Grand Turk Lighthouse, Scott 339, 2 Feb 1978 (Source:  http://lighthousestampsociety.org )

Grand Turk Lighthouse, Scott 339, 2 Feb 1978 (Source: http://lighthousestampsociety.org)

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Turks & Caicos.

Dan comments:

In the 1970's, one of the rare appearances on shortwave was Radio Turks & Caicos (VSI8) which at the time was using, only for a short time, a frequency in the 60 meter band, of 4.788 mhz. There is one mention I can find in the DX press, from DX LISTENING DIGEST MARCH 2003 ARCHIVE, from a SWL who recalled "Turks & Caicos Islands. VSI`s afternoon show on 4.788 MHz``
Those who have collected copies of NASWA or other bulletins probably have other historical records. Unfortunately, I no longer have the logbook details with date and exact time, but it was late afternoon, just as 60 meter frequencies began to be dominated by Brazilian and African stations. As I recall, 4.788 battled with an Angolan station, on 4.795, Radio Comercial, as well as with stations below 4.788.
Two recordings here, one a shortened version -- both end with a Radio Turks relay of a newscast from VOA, where I would eventually spend nearly 34 years as a correspondent. Among other things, reception of Radio Turks demonstrated the great flexibility of the HQ-180 receiver, which provided not only notch capability but fine (vernier) tuning and multiple selectivity positions. So, another blast from the past 1970's -- Radio Turks & Caicos.

Click the title of each recording below to download as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded audio players.

Radio Turks & Caicos (RAW recording):