The Russian Invasion of Afghanistan (1980)

01.U.N.Radio-Security Council (Jan7,1980)
United Nations Radio- Security Council. 15410 khz.
20-30 GMT (i.e. 6-30 am Jan 8, 1980 East Australian Time)

02.Radio Peking (Jan 8,1980)
Commentary from Radio Peking. 20-30 GMT. 25 Metre Band.
(i.e. 6-30 am. 9 Jan 1980 East Australian Time)

03.U.N.Radio-General Assembly (January 14,1980)
U.N. Radio- Debate in the General Assembly. 15410 khz.
20-25 GMT (i.e. 6-25 am. 15 Jan 1980 East Australian Time)

Off-air recordings and intros by Ian Holder, Brisbane, Australia

Information on the history of United Nations Radio-

http://www.unmultimedia.org/radio/english/history/

Other broadcasts on this topic-

https://archive.org/details/RussianInvasionOfAfghanistan1980

Radio Colosal: April 16, 1980

Many thanks to SRAA contributor Paul Harner for the following recordings. Paul notes:

Radio Colosal de Neiva (Colombia) was one of the more reliable signals to be found on 60 meters where I live.  The station was an affiliate of the TODELAR network, and broadcast on 4945 kHz.  Within a year of this recording, Radio Colosal disappeared and the frequency became part of the Caracol network.

Ecos del Torbes: March 1980 (2 Parts)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

Broadcasting from San Cristobal, Venezuela on 4980 kHz, Ecos del Torbes was well heard in midwestern North America in the evenings and early mornings.  Here is a recording of the station from the 11 PM hour (local time) in the spring of 1980.
There is a pleasant mix of English and Spanish language pop, featuring several Venezuelan artists in this aircheck.  There is also a brief newscast in the second half of the recording.  If anyone out there has a better understanding of Spanish than myself, I would like to know the specific headlines, as it would help me get the precise date this recording was made.

La Voz de Huila: April 27, 1980 (2 parts)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

In 1980, Daylight Saving Time began on the 27'th of April.  When I was in high school, the Saturday night overnight hours were a favorite time for me to listen to shortwave signals.  Especially the domestic Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.
On that night, two stations from Colombia were coming in reasonably well, and I decided to record an hour of each of them.
Based in the city of Neiva, "La Voz de Huila" was an affiliate of the TODELAR network ('Primeros en sintonia').  One could easily identify stations from this network through their top of the hour ID's (they used chimes similar to the NBC network in the USA).  The station's frequency was 6150 kHz.
Here is a recording of "La Voz de Huila," taken during the 4 AM hour (local time) on 27 April 1980

La Voz del Llano: April 27, 1980 (2 parts)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

In 1980, Daylight Saving Time began on the 27th of April.  When I was in high school, the Saturday night overnight hours were a favorite time for me to listen to shortwave signals.  Especially the domestic Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.
On that night, two stations from Colombia were coming in reasonably well, and I decided to record an hour of each of them.
It was the first time I ever listened to "La Voz del Llano" in VIllavicencio.  Over the years that station became a favorite of mine.  The station introduced me to music from Colombia.  The music was fast paced, and fun, and so were the promos.  La Voz del Llano was an affiliate of La Cadena Super ('Orgullosamente Colombiana'), and it's 10 kW signal could be heard well most nights.  Their frequency was 6115 kHz, but they tended to vary from that frequency.
Here is a recording of "La Voz del Llano," during the 3 AM hour (local time) on 27 April 1980.

Paul also noted that these recordings were transferred from magnetic tape (pictured above) which had become somewhat damaged over time. We appreciate the effort he has put into transferring this audio and sharing it with us here on the SRAA:

Radio Reloj, San Jose, Costa Rica: Winter 1980

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

In 1980, I purchased my first serious shortwave radio, a Panasonic RF-2200.  While I enjoyed listening to the international broadcasters, it was the smaller domestic broadcasters that I grew to enjoy more.  Especially the Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.  Stations from Colombia and Venezuela were prevalent throughout the evening hours.  Two of the most reliable stations were Venezuelans Radio Rumbos from Caracas (4970 kHz), and Ecos del Torbes from San Cristobal (4980 kHz).  
These stations would broadcast in the evenings and sign-off at 0300 or 0400 UTC. Another was Radio Reloj de Costa Rica on 4832 kHz, which would be heard in the evenings and overnight hours. 
I enjoyed the music and the style of programming these stations had, and over the years these stations became longtime friends on the airwaves to me.
Here is a 30 minute recording of Radio Reloj de Costa Rica from the winter of 1980:

Radio Rumbos, Caracas, Venezuela: Winter 1980

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

In 1980, I purchased my first serious shortwave radio, a Panasonic RF-2200.  While I enjoyed listening to the international broadcasters, it was the smaller domestic broadcasters that I grew to enjoy more.  Especially the Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.  Stations from Colombia and Venezuela were prevalent throughout the evening hours.  Two of the most reliable stations were Venezuelans Radio Rumbos from Caracas (4970 kHz), and Ecos del Torbes from San Cristobal (4980 kHz).  
These stations would broadcast in the evenings and sign-off at 0300 or 0400 UTC. Another was Radio Reloj de Costa Rica on 4832 kHz, which would be heard in the evenings and overnight hours. 
I enjoyed the music and the style of programming these stations had, and over the years these stations became longtime friends on the airwaves to me.
Here is a brief recording of Radio Rumbos from the winter of 1980 on 4970 kHz:

Ecos Del Torbes, San Cristobal, Venezuela: Winter 1980

Many thanks to SRAA contributoe, Paul Harner who notes:

In 1980, I purchased my first serious shortwave radio, a Panasonic RF-2200.  While I enjoyed listening to the international broadcasters, it was the smaller domestic broadcasters that I grew to enjoy more.  Especially the Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.  Stations from Colombia and Venezuela were prevalent throughout the evening hours.  Two of the most reliable stations were Venezuelans Radio Rumbos from Caracas (4970 kHz), and Ecos del Torbes from San Cristobal (4980 kHz).  
These stations would broadcast in the evenings and sign-off at 0300 or 0400 UTC. Another was Radio Reloj de Costa Rica on 4832 kHz, which would be heard in the evenings and overnight hours. 
I enjoyed the music and the style of programming these stations had, and over the years these stations became longtime friends on the airwaves to me.
Here is a snippet of Ecos del Torbes from the winter of 1980 on 4980 kHz: