Radio Nacional de Venezuela: October 11, 2004

Venezuala-Map.jpg

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Dan Robinson, who shares the following recording and writes:

With the news over the past few years, and especially over the last few weeks, of the rapid decline of Venezuela, it’s interesting to recall that there was a day when that country was a powerhouse on the shortwave band, with numerous private radio stations that SWL’s around the world could hear in the 90, 60, 49, 31, and 19 meter bands.
There was also a brief attempt to put Venezuela on the map as an international broadcaster, with Radio Nacional de Venezuela which was audible at good signal levels.

Our thanks to Dan for this 45 minute recording from 2004 when Radio Nacional de Venezuela was on the air (October 11, 2004 starting around 20:20 UTC):

International Day Ecos del Torbes via WRMI: August 12, 2016

Live, off-air, half-hour recording of the special DX program "International Day Ecos del Torbes," celebrating the 40th anniversary of Club Diexistas de la Amistad (CDXA, Friendship DX Club) and the 26th anniversary of the program "América en Antena" (American Antenna) transmitted by WRMI, Radio Miami International, using a transmitter at Okeechobee, Florida, on 12 August 2016 from 21:30 to 22:00 UTC on a shortwave frequency of 15770 kHz. The program aired a half hour later than advertised. The listed transmitter power is 100 kW with an antenna beam azimuth of 44° directed to Europe. The recording begins and ends with the WRMI station identification.

Ecos del Torbes is a radio station in San Christóbal, Táchira State, Venezuela, which began broadcasting on 9 August 1947. Still transmitting as YVOD on 780 kHz in the AM broadcast  band, it used to also broadcast on shortwave as YVOC, 4980 kHz, and YVTX, 6190 kHz, amongst other frequencies over the years. It ceased shortwave broadcasting in March 2003.

The program is primarily in Spanish with a brief introduction in English. Ecos del Torbes station identifications are given in Spanish, English, and French. The program was aired multiple times by WRMI.

The broadcast was received outdoors on a Tecsun PL-880 receiver with a Tecsun AN-03L 7-metre wire antenna in Hanwell (just outside Fredericton), New Brunswick, Canada, in AM mode with 9 kHz RF filtering. Reception was excellent with no interference and negligible atmospheric noise.

Ecos del Torbes: March 1980 (2 Parts)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

Broadcasting from San Cristobal, Venezuela on 4980 kHz, Ecos del Torbes was well heard in midwestern North America in the evenings and early mornings.  Here is a recording of the station from the 11 PM hour (local time) in the spring of 1980.
There is a pleasant mix of English and Spanish language pop, featuring several Venezuelan artists in this aircheck.  There is also a brief newscast in the second half of the recording.  If anyone out there has a better understanding of Spanish than myself, I would like to know the specific headlines, as it would help me get the precise date this recording was made.

Radio Rumbos, Caracas, Venezuela: Winter 1980

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Paul Harner, who notes:

In 1980, I purchased my first serious shortwave radio, a Panasonic RF-2200.  While I enjoyed listening to the international broadcasters, it was the smaller domestic broadcasters that I grew to enjoy more.  Especially the Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.  Stations from Colombia and Venezuela were prevalent throughout the evening hours.  Two of the most reliable stations were Venezuelans Radio Rumbos from Caracas (4970 kHz), and Ecos del Torbes from San Cristobal (4980 kHz).  
These stations would broadcast in the evenings and sign-off at 0300 or 0400 UTC. Another was Radio Reloj de Costa Rica on 4832 kHz, which would be heard in the evenings and overnight hours. 
I enjoyed the music and the style of programming these stations had, and over the years these stations became longtime friends on the airwaves to me.
Here is a brief recording of Radio Rumbos from the winter of 1980 on 4970 kHz:

Ecos Del Torbes, San Cristobal, Venezuela: Winter 1980

Many thanks to SRAA contributoe, Paul Harner who notes:

In 1980, I purchased my first serious shortwave radio, a Panasonic RF-2200.  While I enjoyed listening to the international broadcasters, it was the smaller domestic broadcasters that I grew to enjoy more.  Especially the Latin American stations on 49 and 60 meters.  Stations from Colombia and Venezuela were prevalent throughout the evening hours.  Two of the most reliable stations were Venezuelans Radio Rumbos from Caracas (4970 kHz), and Ecos del Torbes from San Cristobal (4980 kHz).  
These stations would broadcast in the evenings and sign-off at 0300 or 0400 UTC. Another was Radio Reloj de Costa Rica on 4832 kHz, which would be heard in the evenings and overnight hours. 
I enjoyed the music and the style of programming these stations had, and over the years these stations became longtime friends on the airwaves to me.
Here is a snippet of Ecos del Torbes from the winter of 1980 on 4980 kHz: