Voice of Turkey: April 17, 2017 referendum results (English then German LS)

The Voice of Turkey recorded shortly after the "official," though contested, April 16 2017 referendum. The following recording starts around 2315 UTC and begins with the end of the English language service (at marker 14:00). The German language service follows. This recording was made on 9830 kHz with a WinRadio Excalibur and sky loop antenna in North Carolina, USA.

Here is an additional recording of the referendum results broadcast by Richard Langley. This Voice of Turkey broadcast recording begins a minute or so before 22:00 UTC on a frequency of 9830 kHz. The signal originates from a 500 kW transmitter in Emirler, near Ankara, Turkey, and was beamed 310° to Europe and North America. By the way, the announced broadcast schedule at the beginning of the broadcast was incorrect while that at the end of the broadcast was correct.

The broadcast was received indoors on an Eton Grundig Field BT receiver with its built-in whip antenna in Hanwell (just outside Fredericton), New Brunswick, Canada, in AM mode with narrow-band RF filtering. Reception was generally good with some radio-teletype interference at the start of the broadcast.

Voice of Turkey: July 20, 2015

SRAA contributor, Richard Langley notes:

 Live recording of the Voice of Turkey on 20 July 2015 beginning at 21:56:38 UTC on a frequency of 9830 kHz. The signal originates from a 500 kW transmitter in Emirler, near Ankara, Turkey, and was beamed 310° to Europe and North America. 

The recording, initially in English, begins with the tuning or interval signal with station identification, time pips at 22:00 UTC, and sign-on announcement. The announced frequency of 9820 kHz is incorrect (closing announcement has correct frequency). Then follows a news program mentioning the suicide bombing in Suruc, a review of the Turkish press, a report on the Cyprus peace operation, the program "In the Heart of Nature" on Lake Van, the program "Eco-Friendly Tips," "Question of the Month," a musical interlude, news headlines, and the closing announcement. The program proper ends at about 22:45 UTC but the transmission continues with more than 10 minutes of tuning signal filler. The tuning signal is faded down and then restarts at 22:56 UTC in advance of the German program, which begins at 23:00 UTC. The program abruptly and prematurely ends at about 23:05 UTC possibly due to a transmitter problem. 

The broadcast was received on a Tecsun PL-880 receiver with its built-in telescopic whip antenna in Hanwell (just outside Fredericton), New Brunswick, Canada. Signal quality is generally good. However, at the beginning of the recording, there is interference from a radio teletype signal believed to originate from the U.S. military.

Voice of Turkey: June 8, 2015

For your listening pleasure: the Voice of Turkey English language service. 

This recording was made on June 8, 2015 starting at 2200 UTC on 9830 kHz. My recording was cut short due to an approaching thunderstorm (indeed, static crashes are quite audible in the recording). 

Note that this broadcast was made the day after Turkey's elections, when Erdogan's governing party in lost its parliamentary majority.

Voice of Turkey, English: June 7, 2015

For your listening pleasure: the Voice of Turkey English language service.

This program was recorded on June 7, 2015, starting around 2205 UTC on 9830 kHz.  I started recording the program a few minutes after the top of the hour when a digital broadcast on the same frequency finally went off the air. You will actually hear a few seconds of the digital broadcast in the recording below:

Voice of Turkey: August 8, 2014

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Frank, for this recording of the Voice of Turkey English language service.

Frank made this recording in Europe on 15,450 kHz at 12:30 UTC, August 8, 2014. 

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Voice of Turkey, English: May 14, 2014

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Frank, for this recording of the Voice of Turkey English language service.

Frank made this recording on 9,830 kHz at 22:00 UTC, May 14th, 2014. Frank used his Kenwood R-5000 and Wellbrook ALA 1530+ to capture this broadcast.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Voice of Turkey, English: April 23, 2014

Many thanks to SWAA contributor, Frank, for this recording of the Voice of Turkey English language service. 

Frank recorded this broadcast from his home in Europe on April 23, 2014, on 9,785 kHz, starting at 18:30 UTC. 

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Voice of Turkey

VoiceOfTurkey.png

A few days ago, I posted a recording of the Voice of Turkey that noticeably lacked coverage of the Gezi Park protests.

Friday, I recorded VOT’s English language broadcast and was surprised to find that they actually mentioned the protests (admittedly, without it’s due weight) in several news items. I’m very curious how future VOT broadcasts will cover news of yesterday’s riots in Istanbul as police cleared crowds of protesters with water cannons and tear gas.

Click here to download the full recording, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

The Voice of Turkey's lack of protest coverage

Gezi protest in  Kızılay Square , Ankara  (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Gezi protest in Kızılay Square, Ankara  (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Turkey has been in the world headlines now for well over a week. In case you're not up-to-date, here's a summary of what has happened:

On May 28, 2013,  about fifty environmentalists led a small protest in Istanbul to oppose the replacement of Taksim Gezi Park with a reconstruction of the Taksim Military Barracks.  The protests escalated when the group occupying the park was attacked with water cannons and tear gas by the Turkish police. This event led to riots, which were soon widespread; the protests, meanwhile, broadened their scope into full-fledged anti-government demonstrations across the country and even into the Turkish diaspora across the globe.

Yesterday, I turned to the Voice of Turkey on shortwave radio to hear about the active protests currently ongoing throughout the country...

But what did I hear? The only mention I heard of the Gezi Park protests in the Voice of Turkey's English language service were in a passing Turkish press report on the reaction to the protests by the US Secretary of State, John Kerry. The item, moreover, was completely buried in their broadcast and certainly not something upon which they elaborated in the least (listen, beginning at 12:50 below).

I've always loved listening to the Voice of Turkey, but events like this remind me of the simple fact that many international broadcasters are still very much the mouthpieces of their governments. 

Of course, Turkey certainly would not win an award for press freedom; not even close. Reporters Without Borders list Turkey as a country with a "Difficult Situation" with regards to press freedoms, ranking them 154th out of 179 countries in their 2013 Press Freedom Index. To put this in perspective, Finland and the Netherlands occupy the top two spots as models of press freedom, the USA is number 32, and North Korea and Eritrea occupy the bottom spots (numbers 178 and 179, respectively) obviously countries without press freedoms.

I'd like to think that the news readers at the Voice of Turkey would rather give this news the attention it deserves, or at least offer the Turkish government's perspective on the demonstrations. Instead, what we heard was...nothing.  And we heard that loud and clear.

Indeed, the world is paying attention to the lack of news coming out of Turkey right now. Time Magazine posted this article article yesterday, which begins:

As epic clashes between anti-government protesters and riot police turned downtown Istanbul into a battle zone last weekend, the country’s two main news channels had, well, not much to report. One ran a documentary on penguins. The other, a cooking show. To many Turks, their silence was symptomatic of the self-censorship Turkey’s media have practiced under Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s tightfisted 10-year rule. Penguin T-shirts, penguin jokes and penguin costumes now abound — the bird has become a symbol of protesters’ frustration with the mainstream media.

One of the most amazing things about shortwave radio is that by really listening, you can hear the unfiltered voices of regional broadcasters, the clandestine organizations, and the media representatives of their respective countries.

If this story had broken twenty years ago, moreover, I would have heard it as a headline from every respected international broadcaster. Then, upon turning to the in-country "news source," as I attempted to do yesterday when I tuned in the Voice of Turkey and was subjected to a total lack of news, I would therefore be instantly made aware of what the Turkish government didn't want me to hear.

Unfortunately I feel we've lost a bit of this comparative news consumption, not just because of the exodus of many trusted radio broadcasters from the field, but because we've been trained to consume news in (palatable) bites. Our attention spans and interest seem to have diminished to the point that we now often rely on our news sources to interpret for us.  A sad fact...especially considering politically-evolving countries like Turkey still need our attention, interest, and thoughtful support.

Listen to the same Voice of Turkey broadcast I heard yesterday, by downloading the off-air recording or by listening via the embedded player below: