Voice of Vietnam (Vietnamese): September 18, 2017

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Voice of Vietnam in Vietnamese language, recorded outdoors in London, UK on September 18, 2017 at 1700 UTC on the frequency of 7280 kHz using AirSpy, SpyVerter, SDR# software and a 2 x 6m long wire dipole antenna. The transmitter has a power rating of 100 kW and is located in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Voice of Vietnam (27 Jan. 1969)

Voice of Vietnam (27 Jan. 1969)

Shortwave broadcast from the Voice of Vietnam in Hanoi
(Monday 27 Jan. 1969).

- Music
- Woman announcer reads names of captured American GI’s
- Music
- Announcer talks of conditions of captured GI’s
- Music
- Comments from captured American GI’s
- Announcer reads out the names of captured GI’s and comments
  from GI’s themselves
- Music
- Announcer reads out names of GI casualties

Sound quality- fair

Recorded off-air by Ian Holder, Brisbane, Australia

Voice of Vietnam: September 2, 2015

Voice of Vietnam recorded in London, UK on September 2, 2015 at 2030 UTC on the frequency of 9730 kHz using a Lowe HF-150 radio with the Lowe PR-150 preselector, DX Engineering NCC-1 phaser connected to two Wellbrook ALA1530S+ antennas (positioned indoors) to mitigate severe local man-made interference. This was a special broadcast dedicated to the 70th anniversary of Vietnam's declaration of independence.

The transmitter has a power rating of 100 kW and is located in Hanoi, Vietnam. Due to a malfunctioning of the recorder, there were several short gaps in the recording, which were filled in using an earlier (weaker) recording of same broadcast on 7280 kHz at 1900 UTC on the same day. The gaps were as follows:

01:30.619s - 6.415 seconds long
02:08.512s - 1.486 seconds long
02:44.216s - 3.366 seconds long
03:02.060s - 28.847 seconds long

Voice of Vietnam (English and Russian): September 17, 2015

Voice of Vietnam recorded in London, UK on September 17, 2015 at 1600 UTC, on the frequency of 9730 kHz using SDRPlay with SDR# software and a 2 x 6m long wire dipole. The transmitter has a power rating of 100 kW and is located in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Voice Of Vietnam: July 7, 2014

The main   Cao Đài   temple in the city of   Tây Ninh  (Source: Wikipedia)

The main Cao Đài temple in the city of Tây Ninh (Source: Wikipedia)

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Andre Bagley, who submits this recording of the Voice Of Vietnam from July 7, 2014 at 01:00 UTC on 12,005 kHz.

Andre comments:

This broadcast of the Voice Of Vietnam comes from a UK relay that targets North America shortwave listeners. Voice of Vietnam is interesting primarily because it comes from a communist nation. Voice of Vietnam is far more western in it's broadcasting style then Voice of Korea (one of my most listened to shortwave stations). however it's still not nearly as western as China International Radio, which uses anchors with American accents and uses the same style of reporting as domestic news broadcasts here in the states.
I used a Tecsun PL-600 connected directly into the external microphone jack of a Olympus VN-702 digital voice recorder from the headphone jack of the above mentioned receiver. I adjusted the volume of the receiver's audio output so that it didn't overload the voice recorder. The radio employed a whip antenna (about 3 feet long fully extended) and was placed in a location of my house where shortwave broadcasts receive the best.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below: