NHK Radio Japan (Portuguese Language Service): September 5, 2017

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Davi Sousa, for sharing the following recording and notes:

Broadcaster: NHK WORLD RADIO JAPAN
Date of recording: 9/5/2017
Starting time: 2130 UTC
Frequency: 17.54 MHz
Location: Southeast Brazil
Receiver and antenna: MORPHY RICHARDS MR 27024 WITH LONG WIRE

Death of Emperor Hirohito (7 Jan.1989)

*Date calculated by East Australian Time.

01.Radio Japan- January 7, 1989- 07.50GMT- 15270khz
02.Radio Japan- January 7, 1989- 09.10GMT- 11885khz
03.Radio Japan- January 7, 1989- music, news
04.Radio Japan-funeral, news, comment (Feb 24, 1989)

Recorded off-air by Ian Holder, Brisbane, Australia.

Other broadcasts on this topic-

https://archive.org/details/DeathFuneralOfHirohito1989

NHK Radio Japan: April 21, 2014

SWLing Post reader, Chris, has just shared a recording of NHK World he made while traveling in Peru on Monday (April 21st, 2014).

He took the photo above where he made this recording in the picturesque coastal town of Máncora.

Chris recorded this broadcast starting at 10:00 UTC on 9,625 kHz with a Sony ICF-SW7600G and using a Sangean ANT-60 antenna. The actual recording was made with Chris’ Sony ICD SX712digital recorder and he uploaded it using a Dell Windows 8.1 (8 inch) tablet.

Click here to download his recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. 

NHK World - Radio Japan, English: February 8, 2014

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For your listening pleasure: NHK World English language service. This broadcast was recorded on February 8, 2014 starting around 05:00 UTC on 9,770 kHz. This broadcast originated from the Issoudun transmitter site (500 kW).

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

NHK Radio Japan: January 7, 2014

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This Radio Japan (Japanese language) broadcast was recorded on January 7, 2014 starting a little before 02:00 UTC on 5,960 kHz. The broadcast begins with a few seconds of Radio Japan's interval signal.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below: