WTWW (2018 ARRL Field Day Live): June 23, 2018

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bill Hemphill, for the following recording and notes:

I recorded the first two hours of the WTWW Field Day live broadcast off the air on 9930 kHz.  I edited the audio file to remove most of the music.  This shortened the audio file to about 80 minutes in length.  Reception was on a Tecsun S-8800 with indoor wire antenna at my home in Smithville, NJ (5 miles north of Atlantic City).

Ham radio contact between W2PVF and Argentine Antarctic Station LU1ZE: circa 1974

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Many thanks to one of our newest SRAA contributors, Bill Hemphill (WD9EQD), who approached me at the Winter SWL Fest this year noting that he has a wide variety of radio-related audio recordings to share with the SRAA. While many of his recordings are of broadcasts, he also has a number that are of ham radio communications.

This week, Bill shared two fascinating tape recordings he originally acquired from an estate sale.  These recordings were originally made in 1974 by the late Jim Hayward (W2PVF) in Absecon, New Jersey (USA) with two different ham radio stations in Antarctica.

The first recording was posted yesterday. The second recording (below) is between W2PVF and LU1ZE of the Argentine Antarctica Station. The operator at the microphone is W1PV. The recording even includes a phone patch:

Ham radio contact between W2PVF and KC4AAC of Palmer Station, Antarctica: circa 1974

Palmer Station (Photo Credit: Ryan Wallace and the USAP)

Palmer Station (Photo Credit: Ryan Wallace and the USAP)

Many thanks to one of our newest SRAA contributors, Bill Hemphill (WD9EQD), who approached me at the Winter SWL Fest this year noting that he has a wide variety of radio-related audio recordings to share with the SRAA. While many of his recordings are of broadcasts, he also has a number that are of ham radio communications.

This week, Bill shared two fascinating tape recordings he originally acquired from an estate sale.  These recordings were originally made in 1974 by the late Jim Hayward (W2PVF) in Absecon, New Jersey (USA) with two different ham radio stations in Antarctica.

This first recording is between W2PVF and KC4AAC of Palmer Station. The audio starts in mid conversation--we will post the second recording tomorrow:

WSNJ FM (Bridgeton, NJ): "Moods in High-Fidelity" circa 1960s

(Image Source: FadedSignals.com)

(Image Source: FadedSignals.com)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bill Hemphill, who shares the following recording and notes:

Another flea market find. Date unknown – but most likely early 60’s.
This is an off-air recording of WSNJ radio (most likely the FM broadcast), Bridgeton, NJ. After some music, an announcer does station ID, weather, etc. The program “Moods in High-Fidelity” starts at about the 3’30” point. From the program introduction:
“We invite you to hear a special musical high-fidelity program designed to demonstrate the finest broadcasting and receiving equipment. Moods in High-Fidelity for your listening pleasure. Almo Audio Showcase and Weathers Industries present the finest in wide-range high-fidelity recordings together with interesting facts about hi-fi.”

Sir Winston Churchill (MIT Mid-Century Convocation-Part 2): March 31, 1949

CAMERA STUDY BY ARTHUR GRIFFIN, WINCHESTER, MASS. PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE MIT MUSEUM.

CAMERA STUDY BY ARTHUR GRIFFIN, WINCHESTER, MASS.
PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE MIT MUSEUM.

Many thanks to SRAA contributor Bill Hemphill who submits the following unique recording of the MIT Mid-Century Convocation by Sir Winston Churchill.

Bill notes:

This was found on a paper back tape at a flea market. The description on the tape was that it was originally recorded on a wire recorder from a local radio broadcast and was transferred to the paper backed tape in 1951.

Click here for the full transcript of Churchill's speech on the MIT website.

Sir Winston Churchill (MIT Mid-Century Convocation-Part 1): March 31, 1949

Camera study by Arthur Griffin, Winchester, Mass. Photograph courtesy of the MIT Museum.

Camera study by Arthur Griffin, Winchester, Mass.
Photograph courtesy of the MIT Museum.

Many thanks to SRAA contributor Bill Hemphill who submits the following unique recording of the MIT Mid-Century Convocation by Sir Winston Churchill.

Bill notes:

This was found on a paper back tape at a flea market. The description on the tape was that it was originally recorded on a wire recorder from a local radio broadcast and was transferred to the paper backed tape in 1951.

Click here for the full transcript of Churchill's speech on the MIT website.

Note that this recording begins with applause:

Radio Canada International (9/11 Coverage): September 11, 2001 - Part 2

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Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bill Hemphill, who shares the following recording from Radio Canada International made on September 11, 2001. Bill notes that he originally made these recordings on MiniDisc and believes he started the recording around 5:00-6:00 pm EST, tuned to 5.960 MHz. Bill also adds:

I recorded this after I got home from work. Having worked in Tower 2 on the 92nd floor in 1979 & 1980, this was a very emotional day for me. I flipped the radio onto RCI to hear a different view from the US stations. I recorded two hours onto a MiniDisc. There is a break at where I switched discs at about the one hour mark. I'm not sure of the exact time, but it would be around 2200 UTC.

Radio Canada International (9/11 Coverage): September 11, 2001 - Part 1

911.jpg

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Bill Hemphill, who shares the following recording from Radio Canada International made on September 11, 2001. Bill notes that he originally made these recordings on MiniDisc and believes he started the recording around 5:00-6:00 pm EST, tuned to 5.960 MHz. Bill also adds:

I recorded this after I got home from work. Having worked in Tower 2 on the 92nd floor in 1979 & 1980, this was a very emotional day for me. I flipped the radio onto RCI to hear a different view from the US stations. I recorded two hours onto a MiniDisc. There is a break at where I switched discs at about the one hour mark. I'm not sure of the exact time, but it would be around 2200 UTC.