Voice of Greece

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For your listening pleasure: almost three hours of music--ranging from modern to folk--and a little Greek commentary, from the Voice of Greece. Recorded today, May 13, 2013 on 9.42 MHz starting around 01:52 UTC.

Click here to download the full recording, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Voice of Greece

greece

For your listening pleasure: four hours of music, and a little Greek commentary, from the Voice of Greece. I recorded this broadcast on Sunday, April 21st March 8th, 2013 on 9.42 MHz at 18:30 UTC. While recording, I piped the shortwave audio through our home hi-fi system--it sounded absolutely amazing. I hope you'll enjoy it as much as I did.

Click here to download the full recording, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Propaganda from the source: Listening to the Voice of Korea on shortwave radio

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One of the countries dominating the headlines of global news lately is North Korea. As Kim Jong-un raises tensions and rattles his nuclear saber, the rest of the world is attempting to determine if this is a egotistical show of power for the benefit of all observers (as with previous leaders) or if there is real intention behind the rhetoric. Just this morning Pyongyang has warned that Tokyo would be a primary strike target if war were to break out, or if their test missile is downed; they've even moved their missile launch pad into position.

Regardless of outcome of these provocations, I know that the bulk of the North Korean population will suffer. North Korean mainstream "news" consists of images of military parades in the immaculate capital city of Pyongyang; but the reality is that most of the population live in rural North Korea, which is subject to severe food shortages and extreme poverty.

We know North Korea is a country that carefully controls and manipulates their media internally; they also broadcast the same flavor of propaganda externally on shortwave radio via the Voice of Korea.

As shortwave radio listeners, we have the distinct advantage of being able to listen directly to the case of North Korea. We can actually hear (and analyze for ourselves) the North Korea propaganda directly from the source. Note that it's not uncommon for the Voice of Korea to unexpectedly go off air, likely due to power shortages: this fact is much more suggestive of the of general conditions in the country than the "news" itself.

Depending on where you live in the world, your ability to hear the (relatively weak) Voice of Korea will vary.  If you live in the Asia/Pacific region, the station is very audible.

Yesterday morning at 10:00 UTC, I recorded an hour of their English broadcast to South America on 11.71 MHz. You can download an mp3 of the recording by clicking here, or simply listen via the embedded player below.

Below, you'll also find the current broadcast schedule for the Voice of Korea English service courtesy of North Korea Tech:

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VOK English (time in UTC)

  • 04:00 on 7220, 9445, 9730 kHz to Northeast Asia
  • 04: 00 on 11735, 13760, 15180 kHzto Central & South America
  • 05:00 on 13650, 15105 kHzto Southeast Asia
  • 06:00 on 7220, 9445, 9730 kHzto Northeast Asia
  • 10:00 on 11710, 15180 kHzto Central & South America
  • 10:00 on 11735, 13650 kHzto Southeast Asia
  • 13:00 on 13760, 15245 kHzto Western Europe
  • 13:00 on 9435, 11710 kHzto North America
  • 15:00 on 13760, 15245 kHzto Western Europe
  • 15:00 on 9435, 11710 kHzto North America
  • 16:00 on 9890, 11645 kHzto Near & Middle East; North Africa
  • 18:00 on 13760, 15245 kHzto Western Europe
  • 19:00 on 7210, 11910 kHzto South Africa
  • 19:00 on 9875, 11635 kHzto Near & Middle East; North Africa
  • 21:00 on 13760, 15245 kHzto Western Europe

For a full schedule of the Voice of Korea, please visit this page on North Korea Tech.

Radio Australia Jazz Notes

This episode of Jazz Notes starts with a piece by the Australian band,  The Catholics. (Photo: Bugle Records)

For your listening pleasure: thirty minutes of Radio Australia‚Äôs Jazz Notes.

This broadcast was recorded today at 13:30 UTC on 9,580 kHz.  As on most mornings, the signal out of Shepparton, Australia, was very strong; the audio fidelity was, in consequence, very impressive for a transmission emanating from some 9,800 miles away.

You can download this recording of Jazz Notes by clicking here, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Alcaravan Radio

The Alcaravan Radio transmitter site is located south of Bogata.

On March 19th, I was able to record a particularly strong signal from Alcaravan Radio out of Puerto Lleras, Columbia. Alcaravan Radio broadcasts domestically on medium wave and also on 5.91 MHZ shortwave, from 23:30-12:00 UTC.

I have seen their output power listed anywhere from 1,000 - 5,000 watts; a puny amount by international standards, but more than enough to cover their target area of Columbia.

There are very few details about Alcaravan Radio on the Internet. If anyone can add more details about this station, feel free to comment below.

This is a four hour recording and contains about three hours of music.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Australia's Jazz Notes

Jazz Notes presenter, Ivan Lloyd (Photo: Radio Australia)

For your listening pleasure: thirty minutes of Radio Australia's Jazz Notes.

This broadcast was recorded yesterday at 1:30 UTC on 11,945 kHz.  You will note a little noise that bleeds over from jamming of Radio Marti on an adjacent frequency.

You can download this recording of Jazz Notes by clicking here, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Bust A Nut Radio

You know the proceedure

Bust A Nut Radio's AM signal came in fairly strong last night sometime around 5:45 UTC (February 2nd) on 6,940 kHz.

You'll hear a great variety of music--from classic rock to electronica--complete with originally produced ID's and bumpers in this pirate radio recording.

Click here to download an MP3 of the entire show, or simply listen in the embedded Archive.org player below:

Note:This is a recording of a real pirate radio broadcast. If you are easily offended by strong lyrics and offensive music, you should slowly back away.

Red Mercury Labs

electromagneticradiowaves

Last Saturday night, I caught the shortwave radio pirate, Red Mercury Labs, on 6.9251 MHz in the upper side band. This broadcast, which started around 1:57 UTC, contains a great mix of rock music with some commentary throughout.

You can download the full recording as an MP3 file by clicking here, or listen via the embedded player below. Enjoy:

Renegade Radio

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Friday night (late) I caught Renegade Radio on 6.93 MHz in the upper side band. Renegade's signal was consistently clear for unusually noisy conditions, though the station was occasionally plagued with transmitter problems.  I did not edit these out in the recording because dead air never exceeded a few minutes. So, if you hear dead air, simply fast-foward a minute or two. Total broadcast exceeds one hour and, near the end, Renegade informs us that his transmitter was getting hot.  I'll bet: I don't know Renegade's set-up, but many pirates use modified ham radio transceivers that were never intended for those 100% duty cycles, often at full power. Keeps a pirate warm on a winter night, though!

Feel free to listen to the recording of Renegade Radio in the embedded player below, or right click and save this link to download the MP3 directly: