All India Radio (New Year Special): December 31, 2017

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The following recording of the general overseas service of All India Radio was made on 31 December 2017 starting around 2256 UTC. This was received and recorded with a WinRadio Excalibur SDR. The antenna was a horizontal delta loop and location is North Carolina, USA.

All India Radio, English: October 16, 2014

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Frank, for this recording of All India Radio in English. This broadcast was recorded in Europe on October 16, 2014 at 1745 UTC, shortwave frequency of 7,550 kHz.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

All India Radio, English: August 14, 2014

One of my favorite shortwave stations for music, besides ERT Open (former Voice of Greece), is All India Radio (AIR).

Since their broadcasts originate on the other side of the planet (from my North American location), their signal bounces off the ionosphere many times before I ever hear it. I actually like the result of this; the static of space makes their already beautiful music sound even more textured, enhancing the distance of its source, and heightening the music’s sense of mystery and nostalgia.

I recorded this AIR broadcast on August 14th, 2014–around 20:45 UTC–on 9,445 kHz using an Elad FDM-S2. You can download the MP3 by clicking here, or simply listen in the embedded player below. Enjoy!

All India Radio (DRM): April 14, 2014

Shola highlands are found in Kudremukh National Park, Chikmagalur which is part of the Western Ghats. (Photo source:  Karunakar Rayker )

Shola highlands are found in Kudremukh National Park, Chikmagalur which is part of the Western Ghats. (Photo source: Karunakar Rayker)

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, Mark Fahey, who has shared this Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) recording of All India Radio.

Mark explains:

"Almost every morning at 5:45AM (Sydney time) I have my first cup of coffee and eat breakfast and listen to the All India Radio Digital Radio Mondiale (DRM) Hindi language evening broadcast to Europe. At this time of year in Australia (April) the broadcast starts in darkness and ends as the sun is rising. The broadcast originates from the Khampur (Delhi) transmission facility. 

I have a deep love for India and have spent a large part of my life working and living there, so I take every opportunity to listen to All India Radio in both DRM and analogue mode.

Digital DRM provides the opportunity for fade and noise free reception. But as you can hear on this recording, AIR introduces plenty of unintended noise into their programs even before the broadcast reaches the transmitting antenna. The 50Hz hum is a feature I notice in all AIR DRM broadcasts. On some occasions (perhaps every few months) they "forget" to patch the audio path correctly to the transmitter and all that is heard is the hum without any programming for the hour!"

This recording was made on April 14, 2014 starting at 19:45 UTC on 9,950 kHz. Mark received this broadcast at Freemans Reach, NSW, Australia (60 km North West of Sydney), on a WinRadio WR-G31DDC Excalibur Receiver and Wellbrook ALA1530 Loop antenna.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

All India Radio: April 12, 2014

Kedarnath range behind the Kedarnath temple early morning. (Photo source:  Kaustabh )

Kedarnath range behind the Kedarnath temple early morning. (Photo source: Kaustabh)

For your listening pleasure: fifty two minutes of All India Radio's English language service

This broadcast was recorded in North America on Saturday, April 12, 2014 starting around 9:40 UTC on 9,445 kHz.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3 or simply listen via the embedded player below:

All India Radio: a welcome voice

Also published on The SWLing Post:

Many afternoons, I'm drawn to All India Radio on 9,445 kHz. I love what the ether does to their Bengaluru transmitting station's signal as it travels at the speed of light over 8,700 miles to my home here in the southeastern US.

Pressing hands together with a smile to greet Namaste/Namaskar – a common cultural practice in India. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Pressing hands together with a smile to greet Namaste/Namaskar – a common cultural practice in India. (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

I enjoy, too, the way All India Radio announcers speak the news, in slow cadence, honoring the fine tradition of radio: "This is the general overseas service of All India Radio. It's time now for the news.  Please stand by..." I also delight in their English language news bulletins, which begin with "Namaskar."  I appreciate this--it makes it much easier for me to identify the station when listening on an analog radio like my BC-348-Q. I'm sure this makes a difference for many other listeners seeking their station, too.

I also love All India Radio--like I do the Voice of Greece--for their superb music. Where else on the shortwave dial will I hear the sitar sing, as on AIR?

But don't take my word for it. If you live in North America and Europe, when conditions are favorable, All India Radio is a favorite listening experience for many--myself obviously included.

For your listening enjoyment, here is a 30 minute recording I made of All India Radio only an hour ago on 9,445 kHz, starting at 22:00 UTC. Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

 

All India Radio (on the Bonito RadioJet)

The Bonito 1102S RadioJet IF receiver

After posting my latestAll India Radio recording, SWLing Post reader, Pete, suggested that I check out their broadcasts starting around 21:00 UTC on 11,670 and 9,445 kHz, as they are quite strong into North America. He was right.

On Thursday afternoon, I tuned the Bonito RadioJet to 9,445 kHz, where I was greeted with a strong signal from AIR's Bengaluru, India, transmitter site (over 8,500 miles from my home). I compared the signal on the RadioJet with that of my trusty WinRadio Excalibur to find that the RadioJet's audio was somewhat fuller and richer. In situations where AM sync detection is not needed, I may start using the RadioJet for recordings. I've been using it strategically over the past few months for DRM reception and digging weak stations out of the static--something I typically don't record, but probably should, as the RadioJet deserves even more air and recording time!

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I recorded this AIR broadcast on Thursday January 10th–around 21:30 UTC–on 9.445 MHz. This particular broadcast features news, commentary and the wonderful music I've come to expect from All India Radio. You can download the MP3 by clicking here, or simply listen in the embedded player below. Enjoy!

All India Radio

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On of my favorite shortwave stations for music, besides Voice of Greece, is All India Radio (AIR). Since their broadcasts originate on the other side of the planet (from my location), their signal bounces off the ionosphere many times before I ever hear it. I actually like the result of this; the static of space makes their already beautiful music sound even more textured, enhancing the distance of its source, and heightening the music's sense of mystery and nostalgia. I recorded this AIR broadcast on Sunday, January 6th–around 02:30 UTC–on 11.74 MHz. You can download the MP3 by clicking here, or simply listen in the embedded player below. Enjoy!