Radio Iran, Tehran: circa 1970s

Azadi square and tower, constructed 1971 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Azadi square and tower, constructed 1971 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits two recordings of Radio Iran, Tehran.

Dan comments:

Back in the 70's, Radio Iran had an external service, as it still does today, and used the odd frequency of 12.176 mhz which was well heard in North America. Consulting Internet archives, I see an English language program time of 2000 UTC, which sounds about right. The interval signal and sign on are classic examples of old shortwave programming, and this one truly brought Iran right into the living room. The ID: "From the heart of the Middle East, in Iran's capital city, Tehran, the foreign language program department of Radio Iran invites you to listen for the next half hour as we bring you music, news and special features designed to acquaint you with the modern Iran today and to share with you something of the heritage of its fascinating cultural past.

Click on each title to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded players below.

Recording #1:

Vatican Radio: July 13, 2014

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Chris, who submits this recording of Vatican Radio.

Chris comments:

Africa Service of Vatican Radio broadcast at 2000Z on 13 July 2014 on frequency 15,570 kHz. Reception location: Maple Street Park, Lake Michigan, Winnetka, Illinois, USA. Recording equipment; Sony ICF-SW7600G, Sangean ANT-60 reel antenna, Sony ICD-SX712 recorder.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Falkland Islands Broadcasting Service: circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits recordings of the Falkland Islands Broadcasting Service.

Dan comments:

One of the great rarities for shortwave listeners the world over was, of course, the Falkland Islands Broadcasting Station (FIBS). There was great excitment, I still remember to this day, when FIBS was heard by a well-known DX'er in the western U.S. -- I recall the frequency at the time as being 3.958, which was listed in the the World Radio TV Handbook. Many DX'ers spent many hours seeking out FIBS, and it was only some years later, after the station shifted to a frequency of 2,380 khz that it began to be heard quite widely, though still a challenge. These recordings were made in Washington, DC using a Hammarlund HQ-180A receiver.

If you would like to read a brief history of the FIBS, please click here

Click on each title to download recordings as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded players below.

Recording #1:

Radio 4VEH, Haiti: circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Radio 4VEH in Haiti.

Dan comments:

Another shortwave memory for DX'ers was 4VEH, in Haiti, which began in 1950.  This station transmitted on a variety of SW frequencies, including one many of us heard, 15.280 which had a power of only 350 watts.  This recording of the station includes a classic ID:   "Radio 4VEH, the sound of light."  The history of shortwave broadcasting from Haiti is quite interesting and can be obtained through an Internet search.

[Indeed, here is a brief timeline of 4VEH.]

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

BBC World Service: 2014 World Cup Final, Part 1 (pre-game and first half)

For your listening pleasure: Part 1--pre-game and first half--of the 2014 FIFA World Cup via the BBC World Service. 

This recording was made on Sunday, July 13, 2014 starting around 18:30 UTC on 13,660 kHz. The broadcast originates from the BBC Wooferton (UK) transmitter site.

Part 2 (second half) and Part 3 (extra time and post-game) are also available on the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

BBC World Service: 2014 World Cup Final, Part 2 (second half)

For your listening pleasure: Part 2--the second half--of the 2014 FIFA World Cup via the BBC World Service. 

This recording was made on Sunday, July 13, 2014 starting around 20:00 UTC on 11,810 kHz. The broadcast originates from the BBC relay on Ascension Island.

Part 1 (pre-game and first half) and Part 3 (extra time and post-game) are also available on the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

BBC World Service: 2014 World Cup Final, Part 3 (extra time & post game)

For your listening pleasure: Part 3--extra time and post-game analysis--of the 2014 FIFA World Cup via the BBC World Service.

This recording was made on Sunday, July 13, 2014 starting around 21:00 UTC on 11,810 kHz. The broadcast originates from the BBC relay on Ascension Island.

Part 1 (pre-game and first half) and Part 2 (second half) are also available on the Shortwave Radio Audio Archive.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Mexico (XERMX), circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Mexico on 11,770 kHz.

Dan comments:

Radio Mexico, like Brazil some years later, inaugurated an international service in multiple languages, including English, heard on several major meter bands. This recording was made in the early 70's using a Pilot Radio T-133.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Madagascar English Service

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Madagascar English Service with station ID.

Dan comments:

"Little known to many shortwave listeners, although a peek in the World Radio TV Handbook would have revealed, was the existence of Radio Madagascar's "International Service"   With a frequency of 17.730 mhz in the 16 meter band, this was one of the more difficult catches, though on a good propagation day such as this one, the station could be heard quite well in North America.   Here, you hear the station ID in the clear by a woman during a musical program.  Radio Madgascar was also quite good with QSLing and many listeners have one or more of their classic cards in their collections."

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio Rebelde: June 21, 2014

Many thanks to SWAA contributor, Greg Shoom, for this recording of Radio Rebelde (Cuba).

Greg recorded this broadcast in Harrowsmith, Ontario, Canada on June 21, 2014, tuned to 5,025 kHz at 03:38 UTC. Greg used a Kaito KA1103 receiver with built-in telescopic antenna.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Radio Mali Bamako (International Service 16 Meters) circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this recording of Radio Mali Bamako

Dan comments:

Another in the unusual category from my 1970's archives is Radio Mali, with what it called its "International Service".   Mali, at some point in the 70's had acquired new shortwave transmitters -- it would be interesting history to determine where they came from, perhaps former Soviet Union or Eastern bloc.  These were listed in WRTH's and this reception was from the 16 meter band, heard in the afternoon in Levittown, PA.   This was among many stations I heard on the first radio I used as an SWL, a Pilot Radio T-133, my grandmother's radio, which I still have today.  I have played this audio at SWL Fests here in the United States, and offer it here on the archive as another example of SW stations of the past.

Many thanks for sharing this recording of Radio Mali Bamako, Dan.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Moroccan Radio & Television System - Rabat

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this recording of the Moroccan Radio & Television System - Rabat.

Dan comments:

While the Voice of America long had a relay transmitter in Morocco, one of the biggest challenges for DX'ers was hearing the Moroccan Radio & Television System local program in the 25 meter band. As I recall, this was on 11.730 mhz and in this recording you can hear, at about the 22 second mark, the English ID by a male announcer. Time of the program was 1730 - 1800 UTC.

Click here to download this recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

ERT Open (Voice of Greece): July 6, 2014

As I prepare the largest post I’ve ever published on the SWLing Post–a review and comparison of the PL-660, PL-880, ATS-909X and ICF-SW7600GR–I’ve been listening to the music I recorded Sunday night on ERT Open (Voice of Greece).

Regular readers know that I’ve always had a particular fondness of this station. Some nights they play hour long sets of music ranging from folk to modern (I especially love the folk) on 9,420 kHz. Their signal booms into North America as well; indeed, ERT Open can even be heard on a basic shortwave portable with relative ease.

Since I don’t speak or understand the Greek language, I can listen to this music while writing posts and catching up on email correspondence (I’m terribly behind at the moment).

For your listening pleasure: two hours, six minutes of ERT Open recorded on July 6, 2014 staring around 01:00 UTC.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Voice of Korea, English: July 6, 2014

Many thanks to SRAA contributor, London Shortwave, for this recording of the Voice of Korea's English language service.from July 6, 2014 starting at 21:00 UTC on 13,760 kHz. 

Note that this recording was made in London, England in the presence of strong RFI (radio frequency interference). The contributor used his complex RFI-defeating system (which includes phased magnetic loop antennas and digital noise reduction) in order to cancel much of the noise. The end result is much easier to hear, but sounds more "digital" than the typical recording posted here on the SRAA. London Shortwave proves, though, that you don't have to give up SWLing if you live in a high-density urban neighborhood.

Windward Islands Broadcasting Service (WIBS): circa 1970s

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this recording of the Windward Islands Broadcasting Service (WIBS).

Dan comments:

Collectors of QSL cards will recognize WIBS -- it was one of the most reliable verifiers in the 1960's and 1970's. The country eventually became, as everyone knows, Grenada, and replaced the original WIBS card with one for Radio Grenada that looked quite similar.
Windwards Islands BC Service was one of those great regulars for DX'ers in the 70's -- it could be heard as high as the 21 mhz band, but was probably most often remembered using 15.045 mhz. In 1972, it became Radio Grenada, and later Radio Free Grenada.
Excellent histories can be seen here:
Many of us remember enjoying hours of broadcasts from the old WIBS, including cricket and BBC news relays, along with some fascinating local commercials and othe programming.

Click the title of each recording below to download as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded audio players.

Windward Is Broadcasting Service (Raw Recording):

Radio Turks & Caicos VSI8 circa 1970's

Grand Turk Lighthouse, Scott 339, 2 Feb 1978 (Source: http://lighthousestampsociety.org)

Grand Turk Lighthouse, Scott 339, 2 Feb 1978 (Source: http://lighthousestampsociety.org)

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Turks & Caicos.

Dan comments:

In the 1970's, one of the rare appearances on shortwave was Radio Turks & Caicos (VSI8) which at the time was using, only for a short time, a frequency in the 60 meter band, of 4.788 mhz. There is one mention I can find in the DX press, from DX LISTENING DIGEST MARCH 2003 ARCHIVE, from a SWL who recalled "Turks & Caicos Islands. VSI`s afternoon show on 4.788 MHz``
Those who have collected copies of NASWA or other bulletins probably have other historical records. Unfortunately, I no longer have the logbook details with date and exact time, but it was late afternoon, just as 60 meter frequencies began to be dominated by Brazilian and African stations. As I recall, 4.788 battled with an Angolan station, on 4.795, Radio Comercial, as well as with stations below 4.788.
Two recordings here, one a shortened version -- both end with a Radio Turks relay of a newscast from VOA, where I would eventually spend nearly 34 years as a correspondent. Among other things, reception of Radio Turks demonstrated the great flexibility of the HQ-180 receiver, which provided not only notch capability but fine (vernier) tuning and multiple selectivity positions. So, another blast from the past 1970's -- Radio Turks & Caicos.

Click the title of each recording below to download as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded audio players.

Radio Turks & Caicos (RAW recording):

Radio Tahiti, English

Many thanks to Shortwave Radio Audio Archive contributor, Dan Robinson, who submits this short recording of Radio Tahiti's English language service--a very rare recording. 

Dan comments:

"Radio Tahiti was one of the most popular stations on shortwave for many years, audible on several shortwave frequencies. Many SWLs and DX'ers recall the pleasure of listening to hours of broadcasts, which because of the antenna orientation of the station, could be heard at strong levels, at almost all times of the day, including the middle of the afternoon on the East coast of North America. Primary frequencies were 15.170 and 11.825, though others were used. What many people might not recall, or perhaps never heard, was the only English language portion broadcast by Radio Tahiti, called "English by Radio". This recording, made early in my SWL career, was made with the first radio I ever used, a 1940's Pilot T-133, with a classic slide-rule type dial. This may indeed be the only recording in existence of this rare English from Radio Tahiti. Also included -- a recording of Radio Tahiti at sign off, and a longer raw recording of the station in Tahitian and French."

Click the title of each recording below to download as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded audio players.

Radio Tahiti English:

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Wolverine Radio: June 22, 2014

Wolverine Radio  SSTV QSL from October 13, 3013

Wolverine Radio  SSTV QSL from October 13, 3013

Many thanks to SWAA contributor, Greg Shoom, for this recording of the pirate radio station, Wolverine Radio.. Greg comments:

"This is the last part of a broadcast of shortwave radio pirate station Wolverine Radio. 6950 kHz, June 22, 2014 at 0205 UTC."

Greg recorded this broadcast in Harrowsmith, Ontario, Canada; he used a Kaito KA1103 receiver with its built-in telescopic antenna.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below. Please subscribe to our podcast to receive future recordings automatically.

Radio Romania International, English: July 2, 2014

For your listening pleasure: Radio Romania International‘s English language service.

I recorded this broadcast with the WinRadio Excalibur on July 2, 2014, starting at 00:00 UTC on 9,700 kHz.

This broadcast originates from RRI‘s Tiganesti transmitter site.

Click here to download the recording as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below:

Radio New Zealand International: June 28, 2014

Milford Sound, New Zealand

Milford Sound, New Zealand

For your listening pleasure: three hours of Radio New Zealand International, recorded on June 28, 2014 starting around 7:59 UTC on 9,700 kHz.

This recording begins with the The RNZI interval signal: the charming and unmistakable call of the New Zealand Bellbird. After top-of-the-hour news breaks, you’ll hear Peter Fry’s music request show, Saturday Night (click hear to read more about Fry).

Peter Fry will be retiring this week.  His last show will be Saturday (July 5th). I will certainly miss hearing Peter Fry on the air, but wish him the best in retirement.

Click here to download this recording of RNZI as an MP3, or simply listen via the embedded player below: